Daily Assignments

10 Points of Discussion Make-up Form



Tuesday & Monday—November 21 & 27, 2017
Business:

LT: Analyze themes using a balance of text-specific and generalized commentary.

DQs:
  • Judging from what is said about Molly, what do you think of both Godfrey’s and Molly’s handling of their relationship?
  • What do we learn about Silas from his reaction to seeing the baby?

The quotes all come from chapter 12. The format for these analysis paragraphs is as follows:

1. This book: Theme
2. In general: Theme
3. This book: Theme

The goal with all commentary is insight—probe as deeply as you can.

Example Analysis Paragraph for Quote #1:
Godfrey’s mistake was too much passion and too little compassion. This got him into trouble with Molly in the first place, and then again when he told her how he felt about being married to her. When a person is in an inferior position in some way—socially, economically, emotionally—they react better when they receive understanding and assistance, as opposed to anger and condemnation, from those who hold power over them. Pouring salt on their wounds can only encourage them to do something desperate and destructive. If Godfrey had held his tongue, or, better yet, showed compassion towards Molly in her miserable predicament, she probably would not have sworn vengeance against him. Instead of recklessly endangering her life to spite Godfrey, she might have felt some motivation to change.

Short Version (three sentences)
Godfrey’s mistake was too much passion and too little compassion. When a person is struggling, it’s better to encourage than to criticize. If Godfrey had been more positive with Molly, she might have become a better mother.


Write paragraphs of analysis that follow the format above. Offset your general observations with bolded or underlined words.

Six Quotes from Chapter 12
1.     Starts with, “The journey on . . .” and ends with, “. . . eldest son’s wife.”
2.     Starts with, “It is seldem . . .” and ends with, “. . . her vindictiveness.”
3.     Starts with, “She had set . . .” and ends with, “. . . to her lips.”
4.     Starts with, “Turning towards . . .” and ends with, “. . . over it’s head.”
5.     Starts with, “Could this be . . .” and ends with, “. . . beyond the door.”
6.     Starts with, “But along with . . .” and ends with, “. . . been brought out.”



Friday & Monday—November 17 & 20, 2017

LT: Identify both text-local and general themes based on textual evidence.





Friday & Monday—November 17 & 20, 2017

LT: Identify both text-local and general themes based on textual evidence.






Wednesday-Thursday—November 15-16, 2017
Business:
·       The counselling office is doing College and Career Readiness work today in class.

LT: I can identify complex character development based on textual analysis.

DQ:
·       What changes begin to occur in Silas’s life because of the loss of his money?

WN: Silas Forced to Change
Find three quotes from chapter 7.
·       One spoken or thought by Silas
·       One spoken or thought by another character
·       One observed by the author

Indicate what each quote suggests about how Silas is being forced to change by the loss of his money. Synthesize your three observations into an overall change you see taking place.

Quote
What change?
The overall change
By Silas






By Character





By Author






For next time, read:




Monday-Tuesday—November 13-14, 2017
Business:
·       Discussion Make-Up
o   Should be turned in ASAP after the score posting.
o   Can be done using any text we have recently read or are reading now.
o   Needs to be done exactly according to the instructions on the yellow paper.

LT: I can evaluate complex ideas based on textual analysis.

DQ: How is Dunstan Cass doing on the relationship and society power rankings?

WN: Dunstan’s Power Rankings
Write two CCQC (claim, context, quote, commentary) paragraphs on Dunstan Cass.
·       First Paragraph: Evaluate Dunstan on his power and fulfillment in Relationships.
·       Second Paragraph: Evaluate Dunstan on his power and fulfillment in his dealings with Society.
·       Make your claims insightful and original.

Read and annotate




·       Note: Chapter 6 takes place entirely at the Rainbow and demonstrates how the men in the town discuss every day goings on and past events. Nothing happens that involves the story’s plot. They are discussion ghosts when Silas enters the Rainbow at the beginning of chapter 7.



Thursday-Friday—November 9-10, 2017

LT: Apply the themes of power and fulfillment in relationships and society to Godfrey Cass.

WN: Weaving and Hoarding
Write a paragraph or bullet points addressing each of the following. Include a quote or an illustration for each one:
  • Money is different for Silas…
  • Helping Sally Oates…
  • Silas and his coins at night…
  • Breaking the brown earthenware pot…





Tuesday-Wednesday—November 7-8, 2017
LT: Explore the ideas of power and fulfillment in relationships and society.

  • Assess Silas and William in terms of power and fulfillment in relationships and society based on “Silas Marner’s Former Life in Lantern Yard”.
    • Silas on Power in Relationships
    • Silas on Fulfillment in Relationships
    • Silas on Power in Society
    • Silas on Fulfillment in Society
    • William on Power in Relationships
    • William on Fulfillment in Relationships
    • William on Power in Society
    • William on Fulfillment in Society


  • Re-assess Silas in terms of power and fulfillment in relationships and society based on this reading.

WN: Raveloe
  • Analyze Raveloe using a spider web graphic organizer:
    • 1 core observation about Raveloe
    • 4 sub-ideas
    • 2 evidences for each sub-idea












Friday & Monday—November 3 & 6, 2017
Business:
  • Anyone who missed the test needs to take it today.
  • About Writer’s Notebooks:
    • Do not use your writer’s notebook for storage of all previous assignments.
    • If your notebook is falling apart, please replace it.
    • You need a notebook that is only for this class.
    • We will be writing in the notebook more during our reading of Silas Marner
  • I need your copies of Julius Caesar.

LT: Explore the ideas of power and fulfillment in relationships and society.

WN: Betrayal of a Friend
Address this topic in your writer’s notebook by responding to the following questions:
  • Describe what the idea of “betrayal of a friend” makes you think of.
  • How is betrayal from a friend different from betrayal by other people?
  • Provide a brief account of a betrayal by a friend that you are familiar with—either from your own life of from another’s life.
  • What would make some people more vulnerable to being devastated by the betrayal of a friend while others seem less affected?



We watched a clip from Silas Marner the movie.




Wednesday-Thursday—November 1-2, 2017
Business:
  • Julius Caesar writer’s notebooks passed back today.
  • I will have the writer’s notebook and test scores on Powerschool by tomorrow.
  • Anyone who missed the test will take it today.
  • About Writer’s Notebooks:
    • Do not use your writer’s notebook for storage of all previous assignments.
    • If your notebook is falling apart, please replace it.
    • You need a notebook that is only for this class.
    • We will be writing in the notebook more during our reading of Silas Marner
  • I will collect copies of Julius Caesar today.
  • I am collecting your pagetrackers for Julius Caesar today.

LT: Evaluate whether political power is healthy or corrupt.

DQs:
  • What kind of political power is healthy? What kind corrupt?

WN: Healthy or Corrupt Political Power
  • While watching the movie of Julius Caesar, describe times you see political power on display (left side of page) and provide commentary on whether it is an exhibition of healthy or corrupt power (right side of page). If you were absent, you can do this using the play itself.

Examples of Political Power
Healthy or Corrupt?












Monday-Tuesday—October 30-31, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on Julius Caesar today. 

Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook due today:
  1. WN: Notes on Background
  2. WN: Playing Politics
  3. Featuring Cassius/WN: Cassius at Work (not 4th)
  4. Brochure on Conspiracies
  5. Comparing Two Roman Marriages
  6. Carefully Chosen Words
  7. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
  8. Deplorables
  9. “Words before blows…”

LTs:
  • Demonstrate general knowledge of the text of Julius Caesar.
  • Make a text-based observation on politics based on Julius Caesar.

DQs:
  • What have you learned about the public and private side of political power?

  • Brochure on political power.
Example Ideas:

Great politicians need to be “politely” proud.
  • Politicians do better when they present themselves meekly.
  • Politicians have to be comfortable putting themselves forward in front of people.
  • Politicians can act in despicable ways, but only in private.
Capable politicians embrace hypocrisy (being two-faced).
  • Telling the truth can, at times, be good politically.
  • Telling lies is often necessary to paint a picture favorable to your platform.
  • Being one person in private and another in public is necessary to political success

Thursday-Friday—October 26-27, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on Julius Caesar next time

Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook due next time
  1. WN: Notes on Background
  2. WN: Playing Politics
  3. Featuring Cassius/WN: Cassius at Work
  4. Brochure on Conspiracies
  5. Comparing Two Roman Marriages
  6. Carefully Chosen Words
  7. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
  8. Deplorables
  9. “Words before blows…”

LT: Evaluate the rhetorical and persuasive skills of the combatants.

DQs:
  • Who are the better trash talkers?



Finish Groups Skit Scripts

Wednesday-Thursday—October 18-19, 2017
LT: Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.

DQs:
  • Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.
    • Brutus
    • Cassius
    • Antony


Time to work on groups skits

Wednesday-Thursday—October 18-19, 2017
LT: Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.

DQs:
  • Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.
    • Brutus
    • Cassius
    • Antony


Time to work on groups skits

Monday-Tuesday—October 16-17
Business:
·       All scores for Term 1 are on the Powerschool.
·       All discussion make-up is due this week.

LT: Identify use of the Rhetoical Triangle in speeches in Julius Caesar



Time to work on Caesar skits


Thursday-Friday—October 12-13, 2017
Business:
·       Hero Journey stories are graded. If you don’t have a score, it’s because your name wasn’t on your sections.
·       Time to take care of 1st term grade issues.

LT: Evaluate marriages and political strategy in Julius Caesar.

DQs:
·       Evaluate the marriages of Brutus and Portia and Caesar and Calpurnia. Who has the better marriage?


Groups Caesar Skits Assignment


  • At least one skit for each day’s reading.  
  • Focus on key scenes or a key scene. Choose from the list on your pagetracker.
  • You must use a typed script.
    • Name script: JC Skit, Day 1, Fred Jones, Ellen Thomas, Mark Albertson
    • Share it to: turninmyessay@gmail.com
  • Your skit must demonstrate a clear understanding of what you are presenting.
  • Convert Shakespeare’s words to your own words.
  • Use props, clothing, etc.
  • Involve everyone in your group.
  • 4-5 minutes presentation time—no less!

Tuesday-Wednesday—October 10-11, 2017
Business:
·       Hero Journey Stories scores going on by tomorrow.

LT: Evaluate the institution of marriage in Julius Caesar.

DQs:
·       What makes a marriage strong? Name three things.
·       Who was the better marriage—Brutus and Portia or Caesar and Calpurnia?





Friday & Monday—October 6 & 9, 2017
Business:

LT: Identify and articulate text-based themes in Julius Caesar.

Audio of Act I, scene III and Act II, scene I

We read the first part of Act II, scene I

Video of Act II, scene I

  • The main idea is Conspiracies
  • Find quotes from Act II, scene I
  • Derive “rules” about conspiracies from the quotes



Wednesday-Thursday—October 4-5, 2017
Business:
·       Turn in Hobbit books.
·       Turn in Hobbit Pagetrackers

LT: Begin exploring the presence of private (secret) and public politics in Act I of Julius Caesar.

WN: Playing Politics
·       What do you know about the game of politics?
·       How do people win in politics? Why do they lose?
·       What kind of people are successful in politics?
·       What advice would you give to someone considering getting into politics? Make a list of do’s and don’ts.

Scene One
·       What’s going on in this scene?
·       What are Flavius and Marullus criticizing?
Scene Two
·       Cassius is playing the game of politics.

WN: Cassius at Work
·       For each of the following five segments, summarize the conversation (left side of page) and comment on what Cassius is up to (right side of page).

1.     “Brutus with himself at war . . .” (p. 4.6-5.4)                              
2.     “. . . can you see your face?” (p. 5.4-6.3)                                   
3.     “. . . a man of such a feeble temper . . . ” (p. 6.3-7.6)      
4.     “. . . under these hard conditions . . . ” (7.6-9.1)              
“Thy honourable metal may be wrought . . . ” (p. 11.9-12.8)        

Monday-Tuesday—October 2-3, 2017
Business:
  • I will be grading Hero Journey stories soon.
  • Place the Hobbit essay on the top of your “Life” file.

LT: Write an essay that explores in-depth the theme of adventure or heroism in The Hobbit.

WN: Notes on Background
·       Take notes on the slideshow on Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

Julius Caesar Overview
  • Act I: Cassius talking with Brutus and others about the Caesar problem.
  • Act II: Brutus and the conspirators planning the attack.
  • Act III: The assassination and then addressing the people.
  • Act IV: The two opposing sides (Antony and Octavius versus Brutus and Cassius) talk, argue, and plan.
  • Act V: The two sides battle at Philippi; death of Brutus.




Thursday-Friday—September 28-29, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due today
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments (periods 1 & 4 only)
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter
9.     WN: Deus Ex Machina/Defining Moments

LT: Articulate and find textual support for thematic development in response to a prompt.

·       For both the heroism and adventure questions bellow, come up with once claim, two sub-claims and four quotes from The Hobbit (two per sub-claim).

In-Class Essay (next class): Adventure or Heroism in The Hobbit
In a well-organized essay, address one of the following questions:
  • What statement does The Hobbit make about the nature of heroism?
  • What does The Hobbit say about how adventure changes a person?
Examples of Claims and Sub-claims.
Notice that sub-claims are claims (not evidence) that support the overall Claim.

Evidence
Sub-claims
Claims
















Thorin basically goes insane at the high point of his adventure.

Smaug loses his composure when he is challenged.



The dwarves lack initiative when they face difficulties.

The master of the town displays cowardice when things get intense.



The serious and sober are often the first to detect and act against danger.

The laid back and lazy are sometimes able to meet danger with fresh energy and creativity.



Dishonesty allows heroes to safeguard powerful secrets.

Dishonesty is sometimes necessary to limit the spread of evil works.

Adventure can be a cause of insanity in some people.





  
Adventure exposes a person’s weaknesses.




  

Heroes come from all kinds of backgrounds.




  


Dishonesty can be a key hero trait.





Tuesday & Wednesday—September 26-27, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due today
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments (periods 1 & 4 only)
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter
9.     WN: Deus Ex Machina/Defining Moments

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next time.
·       Hero Journey Stories
o   Have all 10 or 12 stages represented at least in outline form.
o   Remember to include names of contributors to any section.
o   Students individually must contribute the equivalent of three sections/chapters.
§  Each section/chapter should be minimum ½ page single-spaced or 1 page double-spaced.

LT: Identify complex issues in plot development.

WN: Defining Moments
Consider how each of the following scenes serves as a defining moment in the story. Present your analysis in the form of three paragraphs (one for each scene) that use the construction we have worked on (claim, context, quote, commentary, closing sentence):

Three Key Episodes from Chapters 17-19:
·       276-278 The Arkenstone influences negotiations
·       288-290 Bilbo visits Thorin after the battle
·       302-304 Bilbo returns home to an estate sale

DQs:
Plot Review
·       How does the Arkenstone impact negotiations?
·       How does it alter friendships and alliances?
·       Describe the Battle of Five Armies.
·       How are various groups reconciled after the battle?
·       Describe Bilbo’s journey home.
·       How are things changed for Bilbo when he returns home?
·       How is Bilbo changed?



Friday & Monday—September 22 & 25, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due next Tuesday/Wednesday
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next Tuesday/Wednesday

LT: Identify complex issues in plot development.

DQs: Identify what is happening in the plot and under the surface in the following sections:
·       249-251—Bard killing Smaug
·       265-267—Thorin responding to the position of Bard and the Elvenking
·       271-274—Bilbo negotiating with Bard and the Elvenking



Wednesday-Thursday—September 20-21, 2017
Business:
·       PSAT Test—October 11th, see flier
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due next Tuesday/Wednesday
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next Tuesday/Wednesday

LT: Analyze, using evidence, major themes and characterizations.

DQs:
·       How are the dwarves portrayed differently than Bilbo in the Smaug scenes?
·       Describe Smaug.
·       Report on the Arkenstone.
·       To what extent is Bilbo’s heroism expanding?
·       To what extent is Bilbo’s bagginsism still apparent?


Monday-Tuesday—September 18-19, 2017
Business
  • Discussing 10-11 today.
  • Read 12-13 for next time.
Review “Scouting Bilbo”

DQ: Characterizations in Chapter 10
Describe Tolkien’s characterization of the following characters in chapter 10:
  • The  Master
  • The Elves and the Elvenking
  • The townsmen of Laketown
  • Thorin and the Dwarves
  • Bilbo

Ø  What conflicts or tensions exist among the above groups?

Larger DQs:
  • What do we learn about the dwarves by the way they present themselves and the way they are received among the laketown people?
  • What examples of leadership do we see in the group as they advance toward and begin camping at the Lonely Mountain?





Thursday-Friday—September 15-16, 2017
Business
  • Discussing chapters 8-9 today.
  • Read 10-11 for next time.
  • Scoring the last two Life assignments today.

LT:  Analyze textual passages for themes.

DQs:
  • Review Claims from chapter 7.
    • The Group?
    • Beorn?
    • Gandalf?
    • Bilbo?
  • What changes for Bilbo in chapters 8-9?
    • Include quotes in your answer.



Tuesday-Wednesday—September 12-14, 2017
LT: Analyze a text to determine overall themes and characterizations. 

DQs:
·       What does Beorn contribute to the story?
·       What is Gandalf up to in this phase?
·       What sides of Bilbo do we see?
·       What phase are we in during chapter 7?
  • How does this phase (chapter 7) compare/contrast to earlier phases?



Friday & Monday—September 8 & 11, 2017
10 Honors English

LT: Analyze and extend a theme found in the text.

DQs:
·       Describe the scene where Bilbo re-joins the dwarves and Gandalf.
·       Is Bilbo’s identity within the group changing?
·       How does having the ring affect Bilbo?
·       Is Gandalf’s view that there’s more to Bilbo than the others know proving true?


  

Wednesday-Thursday—September 6-7, 2017
Business:
  • Discussion make-up
  • Re-submitting Writer’s Notebooks
 DQs:
  • Discuss the nature of goblins.
  • Discuss Gollum.
  • What do we learn about Bilbo from his dealings with Gollum?
  • What does the episode involving Bilbo and Gollum reveal about Bilbo and Gollum?


“Life” Assignment: Bilbo and Gollum
  • In 1-2 pages (double-spaced), discuss what we learn about Bilbo from his experience with Gollum in chapter 5. Include an overall observation about Bilbo, and several supporting observations, as well as evidence from chapter 5.
  • Use effective paragraphing to separate supporting observations.
  • Come up with a title that conveys insight.
  • Do this on you “Life” file. Push down previous assignments so that this one is on top.
  • This is a 40 minute, in-class, timed-write.




Friday & Tuesday—September 1 & 5, 2017
10 Honors English

Business:
·       Opportunity today for re-take on Summer Reading Quiz

LT: Use textual evidence in identifying and articulating themes in chapter 3 of The Hobbit.  

DQ: What themes prevail in the Rivendale section?




Wednesday-Thursday—August 30-31, 2017
Business:
  • Summer Reading Quiz Re-take Friday/Tuesday during class.
  • Writer’s Notebook Turned in Today:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     WN: Cave Drawing
5.     Idea-building

LT: Describe the characterization of Bilbo using textual evidence.

DQ: What do you make of Bilbo? How do you define him?

On your “Life” file (on Google Drive): Analyzing your Baggins and Took sides:
  • Write a 1-2 page, double-spaced personal exploration by doing the following:
    • Paragraph 1: My “Baggins” side—the safe, socially-cautious side. Discuss your experiences and thinking.
    • Paragraph 2: My “Took” side—the adventure-loving, risk-taking side. Discuss your experiences and thinking.
    • Paragraph 3: When my Baggins and Took sides struggle with each other.
    • Come up with an appropriate title.

Monday-Tuesday—August 28-29, 2017
Business:
  • Things we’ve done that will be turned in next time:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     WN: Cave Drawing
5.     Idea-building
  • “The Life of You” should be finished on Google Drive. I am reading and scoring these now.

Looking at Plato’s Cave Allegory
·       Do two organic builds (from left to right) on the following:
o   Leaving the cave—what does it reveal about the nature of learning?
o   Re-entering the cave—what does it reveal about the nature of learning?
·       For each Idea-build, include:
o   6+ Evidences
o   3+Sub-claims
o   1-2 Claims

Starting The Hobbit

Checking out books

Pagetrackers w/ Reading Schedule (see file #7 in the classroom)
  • Requirement: a plot note every 3-5 pages.

WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-3
  • Bilbo Baggins in the main idea.
    • 4 second level ideas
      • 3-5 third level ideas for each second level idea
Read chapter 1
  • Look for Bilbo’s vacillations between his Baggins and Took sides.

Thursday-Friday—August 24-25, 2017
Business:
  • Summer Reading Quiz Retakes: If you would like to re-take the summer reading quiz, do it during the next two consultations.
  • Things we’ve done that will be turned in next week:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     Cave Drawing
  • “The Life of You” should be finished on Google Drive

WN: Poem Quiz
  • Write out all of “Say Naught the Struggle Naught Availeth”

Quiz on “Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth”
·       0-5 goofs=15/15 points
·       6-10 goofs=10/15 points
·       11-15 goofs=5/15 points
  
  • Highlight important details.

 WN: Cave Drawing
  • Using two pages of your writer’s notebook, draw a detailed sketch of what Plato describes in his Cave Allegory.
  • Include 15-20 labeled items, each a quote or a paraphrase from the text, and number them chronologically in the order they occur in the text.


Tuesday-Wednesday—August 22-23, 2017
Business:
  • Absent last time? Do paragraph pre-assessment.
  • Save everything we’ve done—it will be turned in.
  • Turn in signed disclosures.
 WN: Poem Quiz
  • We put this off until next time to save time for the summer reading quiz.

Summer reading quiz
  • If you were absent, make this up with me ASAP.

·       This is due next class.

Friday & Monday—August 18 & 21, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on summer reading next time.
  • Turn in signed disclosure statements by next time.
Quiz on 3rd and 4th stanzas of Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth (no make-up)


Wednesday-Thursday—August 16-17, 2017
Business:

Quiz on first two stanzas of “Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth”

Homework
  • Memorize the last two stanzas for next time.

DQ: Are men like Caesar good or bad for the world?




Tuesday—August 15, 2017
Business:
  • Summer reading check
  • Bring a reading book every day all year.
  • Bring a spiral bound notebook, dedicated to this class only, every day all year.
  • Test any day on Plutarch’s Lives of Caesar and Brutus. Be ready!
  • My blog:
  • suthys10honorsenglish.blogspot.com
    • If you are absent, go to the blog that day!

Homework:
  • Memorize the first two stanzas of “Say Not…” for next time.

Overview of Class


  • We discussed and re-wrote stanzas for the first two stanzas.