Daily Assignments

Explanation of Summer Reading





Friday & Monday—September 14 & 17, 2018
Business:
  • Technology Points
  • Discussion Make-Ups for the first score are due today (Friday).

  • Working on it today and next time in class.

Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook—today, no exceptions.
    1. WN: Ten Prepositions
    2. WN: Cassius at Work
    3. WN: On Conspiracies
    4. WN: On Marriage
    5. Two Roman Marriages
    6. Carefully Chosen Words
    7. WN: Evaluating the Romans
    8. WN: Rhetorical Triangle Notes
    9. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
  • Turning the WN in:
    1. Remove all previously scored handouts.
    2. Make sure all WN entries have a clearly labeled title.
    3. Put the three handouts together where the Julius Caesar stuff begins.
    4. Make sure your name is on the front.
 Julius Caesar Quiz

Wednesday & Thursday—September 12-13, 2018
Business:
  • Pagetracker check—due next time.
  • Discussion Make-Ups for the first score should be completed by this Friday.
  • Finish play by next time:
    • Read days #6 & 7 for next time.
  • Quiz on Julius Caesar next time.
  • Writer’s Notebook due next time. It can’t be turned in late and if you leave it at home, you’re out of luck.
  • Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook
    1. WN: Ten Prepositions
    2. WN: Cassius at Work
    3. WN: On Conspiracies
    4. WN: On Marriage
    5. Two Roman Marriages
    6. Carefully Chosen Words
    7. WN: Evaluating the Romans
    8. WN: Rhetorical Triangle Notes
    9. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
Sentence Parts
  • Mark subjects and verbs in the rest of Practice Sentences #1 and in Practice Sentences #2.
DQ: Evaluating the Romans
  • Evaluate the intellectual and moral depth of the Romans based on Act III, scenes II-III.

WN: Rhetorical Triangle Notes
Logos: Rational or Logical Appeals. Appeal to logical reasoning ability of the audience through use of facts, case studies, statistics, experiments, logical reasoning, analogies, anecdotes, authority voices, etc. Are writer’s claims reasonable? Is there sufficient evidence to support those claims? Does the speaker make logical conclusions? Does he/she talk about counter-arguments, other opinions or points of view?
Pathos: Emotional Appeals. Appeal to beliefs/feelings of the audience. An appeal of pathos can move an audience to anger or tears as a means of persuasion. May attempt to invoke particular emotions such as fear, envy, patriotism, lust, etc. Or, an appeal of pathos may stem from shared values between the author and the audience, or from an argument that caters to an audience’s beliefs.

Ethos: Ethical Appeals. Appeal based on the character, persona, and/or position of the speaker. This kind of appeals give the audience a sense of the author as competent/fair/an authority figure. Such an appeal may highlight the author’s trustworthiness, credibility, reliability, expert testimony, reliable sources, fairness, celebrity, etc.

Monday & Tuesday—September 10-11, 2018
Business:
  • Pagetracker check.
  • Discussion Make-Ups for the first score should be completed by this Friday.
  • Looking forward:
    • For next time, reading day #5 (Act III, scenes II-III).
    • For the next time, reading days #6 & 7 will be combined--so you’ll finish the play.
      • So on Friday (odd classes) and Monday (even classes) you’ll take the quiz on the whole play and any Writer’s Notebook assignments will be due
  • Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook
    1. WN: Ten Prepositions
    2. WN: Cassius at Work
    3. WN: On Conspiracies
    4. WN: On Marriage
    5. Two Roman Marriages
    6. Carefully Chosen Words
Sentence Parts
  • Mark subjects and verbs through sentence #10 in Practice Sentences #1.

DQ: Act III, scene I Theme:
Discuss a theme you see in Shakespeare’s depiction of Caesar’s assassination in Act III, scene I. Use a CCQC (claim, context, quote, commentary) format.
  • Example #1:
Cassius displays a sense of urgency. His impatience with Antony’s extolling Caesar prompts him to declare, “I blame you not for praising Caesar so; but what compact mean you to have with us?” (41) Cassius’s sense of timing forces him to push Antony for a commitment. He knows order must quickly be established before it is too late.
  • Example #2:
The epic mindset is on display in Act III, scene I. In the immediate aftermath of the assassination, the assassins pause to declare how their deed will be seen by future Romans: “How many ages hence shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown!” (38). This boast flavors the scene with a feeling of monumental importance and causes the reader to wonder if the boast is accurate or simply an effort on the part of the assassins to justify their deed.  




Thursday-Friday—September 6-7, 2018
Business:
·       Re-do’s for Plutarch Quiz and Poem Quiz at lunch.
·       Pagetracker check. One note per page.
·       All scores are updated on Powerschool.
·       Explanation of Discussion Make-Up.

Sentence Parts
·       Mark prepositional phrases in Practice Sentences #3.

DQ: Discuss significant or revealing moments from the morning of the assassination (Act II, scenes II-V).
·       What do we learn about:
o   Caesar, Calpurnia, Decius, Portia, Brutus

WN: On Marriage
·       Describe what you feel makes marriages strong.
o   Discuss at least three aspects of strong marriages.
o   Length: Three well-developed paragraphs.




Tuesday-Wednesday—September 4-5, 2018
Business:
·       Re-do’s for Plutarch Quiz and Poem Quiz at lunch. Do it sooner rather than later.
·       Pagetracker check. One note per page.
·       All scores will be updated by next time (reading, discussion, poem quiz, writer’s notebook check, Life of Me)
·       Any questions about the reading?

Sentence Parts
·       Mark all prepositional phrases in Practice Sentences #2.

WN: On Conspiracies
·       You work in law enforcement and have been assigned to present a training on the nature of conspiracies based on Act II, scene I of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. Organize your presentation as follows:
o   An overall theme or main idea
§  Three supporting ideas. Ideas—not evidence.
·       Evidence from Act II, scene I for each supporting idea. 
o   Organize this in your writer’s notebook however you prefer.

DQ: What is the nature of conspiracies?

·       Answer using evidence from Act II, scene I.


Thursday-Friday—August 30-31, 2018
Business:
  • Re-do’s for Plutarch Quiz and Poem Quiz at lunch. Do it sooner rather than later.
  • Pass writer’s notebooks back
  • Pagetracker check. One note per page.

Sentence Parts
  • WN: Ten Prepositions
    • Choose ten prepositions and write a brief story in which you use them in prepositional phrases.
  • We marked prepositional phrases in the rest of Practice Sentences #1.

WN: Cassius at Work
  • For each of the following five segments, summarize the conversation (left side of page) and comment on what Cassius is up to (right side of page).

  1. “Brutus with himself at war . . .” (p. 4.6-5.4)                              
  2. “. . . can you see your face?” (p. 5.4-6.3)                                   
  3. “. . . a man of such a feeble temper . . .” (p. 6.3-7.6)       
  4. “. . . under these hard conditions . . .” (7.6-9.1)               
  5. “Thy honourable metal may be wrought . . .” (p. 11.9-12.8)                    

DQ: What does Shakespeare accomplish through Casca in these scenes?
  • Consider Casca’s interaction with the following characters in your response:
    • Brutus
    • Cassius
    • Caesar
    • Antony
    • Casca

We read Act I, scene III in class.





Tuesday-Wednesday—August 28-29, 2018
Business:
  • Retakes on Plutarch Quiz at lunch over the next two weeks. Just come when you’re ready.
  • First Reading score will happen after Friday.
    • 15 points
    • Minus 3 points for each day not brining a book
    • Can’t recover missed reading points
    • Being tardy costs you reading points

  • Write your name prominently on your Writer’s Notebook.

Writer’s Notebook turned in:
  1. Positive Double Negative Thinking
  2. Five Words
  3. Two Stanzas
  4. Two More Stanzas
  5. Julius Caesar Play Notes

Quiz on Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth

Sentence Parts Unit Start (see file #5)
  • We marked the prepositions in the first ten sentences of Practice Sentences #1.


Julius Caesar Overview
  • Act I: Cassius talking with Brutus and others about the Caesar problem.
  • Act II: Brutus and the conspirators planning the attack.
  • Act III: The assassination and then addressing the people.
  • Act IV: The two opposing sides (Antony and Octavius versus Brutus and Cassius) talk, argue, and plan.
  • Act V: The two sides battle at Philippi; death of Brutus.

DQ: What conflict or conflicts exist in Act I, scene I?
  • Include a quote in your observation.

Reading Act I, scene II in class . . .





Friday & Monday—August 24 & 27, 2018
Business:
  • Next time:
    • Quiz on Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth—the entire poem.
    • Writer’s Notebook turned in:
      • Positive Double Negative Thinking
      • Five Words
      • Two Stanzas
      • Two More Stanzas (today)
      • Julius Caesar Play Notes (today)
  • Today:
    • Confessions Speech
    • Quiz on last two stanzas of poem
    • Starting Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

Confessions Speech

Poem Quiz
WN: Two More Stanzas
·       Write out the last 8 lines of the poem from memory. We did a practice score on this.

  • WN: Julius Caesar Play Notes
    • Take notes on this slide show.

Read Act I, scene I of Julius Caesar

  • We read Act I, scene I of the play. No additional reading is assigned. 

Wednesday-Thursday—August 22-23, 2018
Business:
  • Any Disclosure Statements or Paragraph Assessments?
  • Plutarch quiz scores will be posted soon.
  • Next two stanzas of the poem need be memorized by next time.
  • “Life of You” will be due next time.

27 Speech
Lazy Ozzie
Next time: Honestly Chat

Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth
  • Discuss third and fourth stanzas
  • Memorize the third and fourth stanzas for next time




Monday-Tuesday—August 20-21, 2018
Business:
  • Reading Books
    • Chocolate/Spinach Speech
    • 27 Speech
  • Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth
    • Quiz on first two stanzas
      • WN: Two Stanzas
        • Write out the first two stanzas without looking at the poem
Preparation for Writing:
            The Life of . . [You]
  • In-class writing assignment next time.
  • Brief autobiographical story of the most defining or important times in your life so far.

WN: Life of [You] Prep
  • List and briefly describe the experiences and lessons that have most significantly shaped your life.
  • Like Plutarch, you’re not going to tell everything about your “Life”--you’ll focus on what stands out the most.

Plutarch Quiz






Thursday & Friday—August 16-17, 2018
Business:
  • Disclosure Statements
    • Bring them back signed.
    • On getting missed work
  • Technology Points
    • You get them for free
    • You lose them for being on your phone when you shouldn’t be
  • Reading Books
    • Reading book check
    • 15 points every three weeks
    • Non-recoverable if you get dinged (3 points per ding)
  • Discussion Points
    • 20-40 every three weeks
    • You need to make at least on informed comment per major discussion
    • Missed discussion points can be make up using the Discussion Make-up Form
  • Quiz on Plutarch reading next time!
    • It’s open-book
  • Spiral Notebooks
    • For written entries
    • For holding assignments until they are turned in
    • WN: Five Words
      • Write down five words that describe Julius Caesar. For each word write a sentence explaining why the word fits.
      • Everyone will share a word. Make your words as distinct as possible so that if someone uses your word, you have another word no one has used.




Wednesday—August 15, 2018
Business:
  • Summer reading check
  • Bring a reading book every day all year.
  • Bring a spiral bound notebook, dedicated to this class only, every day all year.
  • Test any day on Plutarch’s Lives of Caesar and Brutus. Be ready!
  • My blog:
  • suthys10honorsenglish.blogspot.com
    • If you are absent, go to the blog that day!

·       Do the first two stanzas

·       Return with parent signature
















































Daily Assignments









10 Points of Discussion Make-up Form


Thursday-Friday—May 17-18, 2018
Business:
·       Quiz on The Chosen today
·       Writer’s Notebook due today:
o   Overview of The Chosen: Slideshow notes
o   Hasidism in America-Part I
o   Hasidism in America-Part II
o   Hasidism in America-Part III
o   Hasidism in America-Part IV
o   History Lesson—Flow Chart (honors only)
o   Character Claim Quotes (honors only)
o   Notes on Postville: When Cultures Collide
·       Checking in The Chosen today.
·       Turn in: Pagetracker for The Chosen

·       Turn in: Plotting Plot and Theme: Chapter 14

Tuesday & Wednesday—May 15-16, 2018
Business:
  • Quiz on The Chosen next time
  • Writer’s Notebook due next time:
    • Overview of The Chosen: Slideshow notes
    • Hasidism in America-Part I
    • Hasidism in America-Part II
    • Hasidism in America-Part III
    • Hasidism in America-Part IV
    • History Lesson—Flow Chart (honors only)
    • Character Claim Quotes (honors only)
    • Notes on Postville: When Cultures Collide
  • Checking in The Chosen next time—be sure to bring it.

DQs:
  • Discuss a theme you feel Potok is trying to develop in his portrayal of Reuven in chapters 14-15.


Sentence Parts:
  • Action Verbs and Direct Objects
  • Linking Verbs and Subjective Complements
  • Mark everything in Practice Sentences #4

Friday & Monday—May 11 & 14, 2018
Business:
  • Sage Testing wrap up.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter title for chapter 13. (collect, stamp, return).
  • Due today: Thinking Inside and Outside the Box: Chapters 10-12
  • Don’t worry about turning in The Chosen until we are finished with it.

LT: Demonstrate knowledge of character development in chapters 10-12.

DQs:
  • What do the events of chapters 13 reveal about Danny and Rueven?
    • Danny and Reuven in college
    • David Malter’s Zionist activities
    • David and Reuven’s serious talk
    • Danny and Prof. Appleman
    • Zionism and the college
    • The big rally and the aftermath


WN: Postville: When Cultures Collide
  • One-page of notes
    • The Iowans
    • Hasidic Jews
    • Mexican Immigrant Workers
      • What conflicts arise among these groups?



Wednesday-Thursday—May 9-10, 2018
Business:
  • Sage Testing wrap up.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter title for chapters 10-12 (collect, stamp, return).
  • Due today: Plot, Characterizations, and Applications: Chapter 8

Sentence Parts Marking:
  • Mark prepositional phrases, subjects and verbs in Practice Sentences #3.

LT: Demonstrate knowledge of character development in chapters 10-12.

DQs:
  • What do the events of chapters 10-12 demonstrate about how culture impacts relationships and how relationships impact culture?
    • Culture impacts Relationships
    • Relationships impact Culture
  • How does increased stress impact the interaction between culture and relationships?


Hasidism in America: Part IV
  • ½ page notes






Monday-Tuesday—May 7-8, 2018
Business:
  • Sage Testing wrap up.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter title for chapters 8-9.
  • Due today: Hasidism and Jewish Enlightenment: Chapter 7
  • For anyone gone last time, I collected:
    • Hasidism and Jewish Enlightenment
    • First Off, Jewish Culture
    • Malter Culture
    • New Friend-New World: Chapters 5-6 (10 Regular)
    • Danny Dishes on His Father: Pages 116-119 (10 Regular)
  • Again, if you were absent last time, the following assignments were turned in for 90% credit.
    • Three Reflections
    • Three Visits
    • Who’s the Real Apikoros?
    • Meet Chaim Potok
    • Potok and The Chosen: What do you think?

LT: Demonstrate knowledge of character development in chapters 8-9.

DQs:
  • Based on chapters 8-9, what is something you feel Potok want us to understand or believe about the following characters?
    • Reuven
    • Danny
    • Reb Saunders
    • Mr. Malter 


WN: Character Claim & Quotes
  • Write out a claim that articulates something you feel Potok wants us to believe about one of the main characters.
  • Write out four quotes from chapters 7-9 that could be used to support your claim.
  • Be ready to share ideas that help prove your claim (sub-claims).


Analysis vs Plot Summary
Heavy on Analysis
Heavy on Plot Summary
Reuven displays a weak ability to take in a culture different from his own without feeling judgemental. His focus seems fixated on aspects of Dannys’ culture that to him are inferior to his own culture. Unlike his father, Reuven is less able to focus on the admirable aspects of Danny’s culture without being distracted by what seems different and strange. Throughout Reuven’s visit to Danny’s synagogue, he spends a lot of time observing dim light bulbs, worn hymn books and what to him is a laughable way to gain admiration--catching mathematical errors in discussions of Talmud.

When Reuven walks with Danny to his synagogue, his attention is focused on the run-down condition of Danny’s neighborhood. Reuven also notices the gruff and rude attitude of the Hasidic men as one bumps him roughly and others turn and look at him with annoyance. Additionally, Reuven notices the dark and worn condition of both the synagogue and the materials in it, like the hymn books. Things are much nicer in Reuven’s synagogue. It seems clear Potok wants us to take notice of Reuven’s cultural isolation and his weak ability to observe a different culture uncritically.

Character Essay—30-minute timed write in class next time:
Choose a character featured prominently in chapters 7-9 and explain what you feel Potok wants us to understand or believe about that character.

You may organize this however you would like.

You must include the following:
  • An overall claim that is bolded and underlined.
  • Sub-claims/topic sentences that are bolded.
  • “Quotes in quotation marks and with page numbers” (10).
  • Abundant insightful commentary. There should be only a very little plot-summary included in your commentary. Don’t spend time recounting plot—assume your reader is thoroughly familiar with the plot and will understand all of your assertions without explanations of plot.


Length: An overall claim with two or more sub-claims must be developed with good depth with several quotes and with commentary. This is the length requirement. 

Thursday & Friday—May 3-4, 2018
Business:
  • Sage Testing wrap up.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter title for chapter 7.
  • Today I am collecting:
    • First Off, Jewish Culture
    • Malter Culture

  • The following assignments may be turned in for 90% credit today.
    • Three Reflections
    • Three Visits
    • Who’s the Real Apikoros?
    • Meet Chaim Potok
    • Potok and The Chosen: What do you think?

LT: Analyze Potok’s character and theme development in chapters 7.

DQs:
  • What does Reuven’s visit to Danny’s synagogue reveal about Reuven, Danny and Reb Saunders?
  • Compare and contrast Jewish Enlightenment with Hasidism as portrayed in chapter 7.



Character Essay—30-minute timed write in class next time:
Choose a character featured prominently in chapters 7-9 and explain what you feel Potok wants us to understand or believe about that character.

You may organize this however you would like.

You must include the following:
  • An overall claim that is bolded and underlined.
  • Sub-claims/topic sentences that are bolded.
  • “Quotes in quotation marks and with page numbers” (10).
  • Abundant insightful commentary. There should be only a very little plot-summary included in your commentary. Don’t spend time recounting plot—assume your reader is thoroughly familiar with the plot and will understand all of your assertions without explanations of plot.

Length: An overall claim with two or more sub-claims must be developed with good depth with several quotes and with commentary. This is the length requirement.



Tuesday & Wednesday—May 1-2, 2018.
Business:
  • Sage Testing wrap up.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter titles for chapters 5 & 6.
  • Today I am collecting:
    • Meet Chaim Potok
    • Potok and The Chosen: What do you think?
  • Due next time:
    • First Off, Jewish Culture
    • Malter Culture
  • The following assignments may be turned in for 90% credit on the first Late Work Day—this Thursday/Friday:
    • Three Reflections
    • Three Visits
    • Who’s the Real Apikoros?
    • Meet Chaim Potok
    • Potok and The Chosen: What do you think?

LT: Analyze Potok’s character and theme development in chapters 5-6.

DQs:
  • What phase is Reuven in? What is Reuven experiencing? What is Potok suggesting with the detailed descriptions in chapter 5? How have Reuven’s interactions with Danny impacted Reuven?
  • How does Mr. Malter’s history lesson help explain Danny?
 WN: History Lesson (10 Honors only)
  • Using a two page spread in your writer’s notebook, create a visual diagram or flow-chart of the history lesson Reuven’s father gives him in chapter 6.
  • Include also a paragraph explaining how this lesson explains Danny Saunders. Include all of the people or things listed below:

Chapter 6 highlights
·       Jews in Poland
·       A Jewish Utopia
·       Buffers
·       Chmielnicki Uprising
·       Shabbtai Zvi
·       Jewish Scholarship Dead
·       Pilpul
·       Superstition
·       Ba’ale Shems/Masters of the Name
·       Israel/Ba’al Shem Tov/Besht
·       Tzaddikim
·       Solomon/Maimon







Friday & Monday—April 27 & 30, 2018
Business:
  • Finishing Sage testing.
  • Late work may be turned in for a Late Work score Later. It must be 100% complete to be turned in.
  • Stamp Pagetrackers for notes and chapter titles through chapter 4.
  • Collect:
    • Three Visits
    • Who’s the Real Apikoros?

Sentence Parts
  • Why we mark prepositional phrases first—they are modifiers, which means they are optional. No essential “parts” (subjects, verbs, etc.) will be in prepositional phrases. 
  • Subjects and Verbs—Read the information on page 1.
  • Mark all subjects and verbs in Practice Sentences #2.
  • Mark all prepositional phrases, subjects and verbs in Practice Sentences #3.

LT: Analyze Potok’s character and theme development in chapters 3-4.

DQs: Discuss the following using evidence from the text.
  • Explain Danny.
    • Who is he? How would he define himself? What different dimensions of him are there?
  • Explain Reuven and Danny becoming friends.
    • What differences exist between them? What do they have in common?
  • Explain how culture and relationships are interacting in the story.


WN: Hasidism in America segment #2
  • ½ page notes, again.



Finish and be ready to turn in next time:

  • Meet Chaim Potok (see April 10th, the day this was given out)
  • Potok and The Chosen: What do you think? (see April 10th)


Wednesday-Thursday—April 25-25, 2018
Business:
  • I collected Fiddler Reflections two times ago. If you were absent, they are due now.
  • SAGE testing today. If you missed day 1 and you don’t finish today, you’ll be finishing next time during class.
  • We will suspend reading in The Chosen for our two Sage testing days. So for Friday/Monday, you need to have read chapters 3-4 and caught up your pagetracker notes and chapters titles.
  • By Friday/Monday, you need to have completed two assignments:

Monday-Tuesday—April 23-24, 2018
Business:


Thursday-Friday—April 19-20, 2018
Business:
  • I’m collecting Fiddler Reflections today.
  • SAGE testing starts Monday, April 23rd. Bring your own earphones if possible for the listening portion.
  • ½ points for Reading if you don’t bring your own book. Missed points for being tardy.
  • Jacket and hoodie in back of room…

Sentence Parts
  • Why we mark prepositional phrases first—they are modifiers, which means they are optional. No essential “parts” (subjects, verbs, etc.) will be in prepositional phrases. 
  • Subjects and Verbs—Read the information on page 1.
  • Mark all subjects and verbs in Practice Sentences #1.

Prep on Pagetracker
  • Prep taken daily going forward.
    • Chapter tittles
    • A note every 3-5 pages.

LT: Identify emerging themes in chapter 1.

DQs:
  • Describe the journey Reuven began with the ballgame.
  • What is he learning? What does he need to learn? What are his strengths? His weaknesses? Where is he on this journey as his father leaves the hospital?
  • What roles are the following playing in Reuven’s experience: Danny, Mr. Savo, Billy, Reuven’s father



Tuesday-Wednesday—April 17-18, 2018
Business:
  • I’m collecting Fiddler Reflections next time. They need to be ¾ page at least to get full credit.
  • SAGE testing starts Monday, April 23rd. Bring your own earphones if possible for the listening portion.
  • Technology score for this term—30 points.
  • Discussion points back to every three weeks.
  • ½ points for Reading if you don’t bring your own book. Missed points for being tardy.
  • Hall pass is for 3-4 minutes. If you’re gone for longer, you lose the privilege.
  • Jacket and hoodie in back of room…

More on Prep Phrases
  • Study prepositions—memorize at least ten.
  • Quick quiz on prepositions—list ten.
·       Mark all prep phrases in Practice Sentences #2.

Review Pagetracker
  • Prep taken daily going forward.
    • Chapter tittles
    • A note every 3-5 pages.

LT: Identify emerging themes in chapter 1.

Review “First Off Jewish Culture”
  • What did you learn that helps you understand Jewish culture?

DQs:
  • Describe the two cultures in chapter 1.
  • What’s really going on with this ballgame?

WN: Hasidism in America clip #1
·       Take ½ page of notes on this clip.










Friday & Monday—April 13 & 16, 2018
Business:
  • The goal is to pass the class. My goal—your goal.
  • Reflections on Fiddler on the Roof are due today. To make up a missed day, write an additional Reflection based on one of the days you watched.
  • We’ll start reading The Chosen today.
  • SAGE testing starts Monday, April 23rd. Bring your own earphones if possible for the listening portion.
  • Technology score for this term—30 points.
  • Discussion points back to every three weeks.
  • ½ points for Reading if you don’t bring your own book.
  • Hall pass is for 3-4 minutes. If you’re gone for longer, you lose the privilege.

LT: Identify instances of Culture and Relationship impacting each other.

DQs:
  • Share observations about Culture and Relationships from Fiddler on the Roof.

Activities:

  • Overview the unit by reading pages 1-3.

Share Culture and Relationship observations from Fiddler
  • Stamps for Reflections that are finished.
  • Two Questions:
    1. When does culture drive relationships?
    2. When do relationships shape culture?


  • Read Chapter 1

Thursday, April 12, 2018
Periods 2 & 4 only


Fiddler Notes (see file #7) Yellow sheet--day three.



Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Periods 1, 3, 7 only


Fiddler Notes (see file #7) Yellow sheet--day 3.



Tuesday, April 10, 2018
Periods 2 & 4 only
Business:
  • Overview of next few days:
    • Start prepping for The Chosen today.
    • Watching parts of “Fiddler on the Roof” the next three days.
    • Mrs. Stowell subbing off and on through the week after Spring Break.
    • We’ll start reading The Chosen after Spring Break.
    • SAGE testing a week or so after Spring Break.
    • Next class we will check in Frankenstein—be sure to bring it.

LT: Identify areas of focus for The Chosen.

Activities:

Overview of The Chosen—slideshow. Take notes in your Writer’s Notebook
  • WN: Chosen Overview Notes

Meet Chaim Potok (see file #3)
Potok & The Chosen: What do you think? (see file #4)

Fiddler Notes (see file #6) Green sheet--day two.






Friday, March 30, 2018
Periods 1, 3, 7 only


Fiddler Notes (see file #6) Green sheet--day two.



Thursday, March 29, 2018
Periods 2 & 4 only:

Fiddler Notes (see file #5) Pink sheet--day one.




Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Periods 1, 3, 7 only
Business:
  • Overview of next few days:
    • Start prepping for The Chosen today.
    • Watching parts of “Fiddler on the Roof” the next three days.
    • Mrs. Stowell subbing off and on through the week after Spring Break.
    • We’ll start reading The Chosen after Spring Break.
    • SAGE testing a week or so after Spring Break.
    • Next class we will check in Frankenstein—be sure to bring it.

LT: Identify areas of focus for The Chosen.

Activities:

Overview of The Chosen—slideshow. Take notes in your Writer’s Notebook
  • WN: Chosen Overview Notes

Meet Chaim Potok (see file #3)

Fiddler Notes (see file #5) Pink sheet--day 1.




Monday and Tuesday—March 24 & 25

Honors:

LT: I can apply my understanding of gender norms to Margaret Atwood’s short story, “Simmering,” identifying what the author believes about gender norms.
           
Fly-Swatter Vocab Activity—Students reviewed the words we have learned throughout our reading of Frankenstein and we had a class activity over all the words.

Review your reading of “The Darling.” Respond to four of the five discussion questions in your writer’s notebook.


Homework: “Simmering” by Margaret Atwood. Annotate “Simmering” as you read, identifying what Margaret Atwood thinks about gender norms.


Thursday-Friday, March 21-22, 2018
Business:
  • Discussion points are back on for 4th term—every three weeks.
  • Technology points during 4th term.

LT: Learn to define and recognize Irony.

Activities:

First read of “The Story of An Hour” (see file #24)

Instruction to Irony

Notes on definitions and examples of Irony (see file #25)
    • Verbal Irony
    • Situational Irony
    • Dramatic Irony

Second read of “The Story of An Hour” in groups


Homework: Read “The Darling” (see file #2) annotating with a focus on the development of the protagonist, Olenka, and how she is a contrast to Louise in “The Story of An Hour”.

Kahoot quiz on Irony



Tuesday and Wednesday—March 20 & 21

LT: I can read several Edgar Allan Poe short stories, identifying the most prominent mood of the story and the techniques Poe employs to convey that mood.

WN: What is your greatest fear? Why? Explain.

Brief presentation on short stories and Edgar Allan Poe’s bio.

All about Poe: We read “The Tell-Tale Heart” as a class, annotating as we read. We then discussed the techniques Poe employs to convey a mood of insanity/fear. Next, we read “The Black Cat.” Again, we annotated as we read, identifying the various techniques Poe employs.

To listen to an excellent reading of “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Christopher Lee, check out this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeZrRENgXmY. You can also find his reading of “The Black Cat” on YouTube.


Homework: Write a one-paragraph response to “The Tell-Tale Heart” or “The Black Cat.” In your paragraph, make a claim, identifying what you consider to be the most prominent mood of the story. Next, identify the techniques Poe employs to capture that mood. You must include at least two quotes from the story in your paragraph.

Friday and Monday—March 16 & 19

LT: I can collaborate with others in an effort to deliver a visual presentation on the topic my group has researched.

Presentation Day! Make sure your presentation is complete and share it with turninmyessay@gmail.com. You will hand three things in on the day of your presentation: your script, your peer evaluations, and one rubric for your group.

Notes: Throughout the presentations, take at least 5 bulleted notes on every presentation.

Writer’s Notebook: Last day to turn in your writer’s notebook. Your writer’s notebook will go on the third term’s grades.

Homework: NONE!



Wednesday and Thursday—March 14 & 15

Honors

LT: I can collaborate with others in an effort to conduct a short research project, in which I research a topic relevant to Frankenstein.

No quiz today. I want you to spend the time working on your research projects, so I will simply drop your lowest quiz score…you’re welcome!

Organize Writer’s Notebooks:

·       Haiku Poems
·       Frankenstein Intro Notes
·       Frankenstein Anticipation Guide
·       “Destiny” Writer’s Notebook Response
·       Romantic Era Notes
·       Frankenstein 5 Discussion Question
Responses
·       “Bad News” Writer’s Notebook Response
·       William’s Murder Paragraph
·       Frankenstein Four Themes Handout
·       Creature’s Dating Profile
·       “Beauty” Writer’s Notebook Response
·       “Who’s the Real Monster?” Creature/Victor’s Arguments T-chart and paragraph

Homework: Writer’s Notebooks due next class period—no exceptions! If you are going to be absent, then find someone who can bring it to school for you!
You will also present your research presentations next class period, so make sure you have your script and slideshow completed. Print off your script and bring it to class! Share your Google Slides presentation with turninmyessay@gmail.com.



Monday and Tuesday—March 12 & 13

Honors

Business: Quiz over chapters 23-24 next time! If you score well, this score will replace your lowest quiz score!

LT: I can collaborate with others in an effort to conduct a short research project, in which I research a topic relevant to Frankenstein.

Vocab:
·      Indefatigable (adj.): able to work or continue for a very long time without becoming tired: tireless.
Ex: Truman Burbank proved that man is indefatigable in his pursuit to create and determine his own reality.
·      Erroneous: containing or characterized by error: mistaken
Ex: Most of our initial assumptions about others prove to be erroneous later.

Quiz over chapters 20-22

Frankenstein Group Project: You will be provided with 19 topics to choose from. In a group of two to three, you will select a topic and conduct research on that topic. Each topic is relevant to Frankenstein in some way. As you research, you will create a visual presentation on Google Slides. The slideshow should not have any text, but should only be a slideshow of images relevant to the script you will write. The script will act as the dialogue for your presentation. For your script, write the slide number and then compose a 6-7 sentence paragraph for that slide. Your script should demonstrate that you’ve thoroughly researched your topic. Your slideshow should be a total of 6-9 slides. If you have any questions or concerns, let me know. The rubric for this project was provided in class.



Homework: Chapters 23-24

Thursday and Friday—March 8 & 9

Business: Make-up fishbowl session will be help on Monday March 12 during consultation. Bring your one-page written preparation to the fishbowl discussion with you! 

LT: I can do a close reading of chapters 17 and 20, looking for the main arguments the creature and Victor Frankenstein make. I can then determine which argument is more compelling based on the ethos, logos, or pathos of their arguments.

WN: Title this writer’s notebook entry, “Beauty.” In Frankenstein, the creature become a social pariah due to his physical appearance. Consider the role physical appearance plays in our own society as you read the following article: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/09/opinion/being-dishonest-about-ugliness.html.
Joseph Merrick was born in England in 1862. Although Joseph Merrick was not born with any physical deformities, he gradually became more disfigured due to a disease. In 1880, a film was made based on Joseph Merrick’s story. In the film, Joseph Merrick was ostracized from society and eventually became an exhibit in the circus, receiving the moniker, “The Elephant Man.” A doctor visiting the circus took compassion on Merrick and built a room for Merrick in his hospital. Watch the following two clips from “The Elephant Man.”
After watching those clips, write about the role physical appearance plays in our own society. Consider the following questions: In our own society, are people ostracized due to their physical appearance? Explain. Does our society value one’s character more than one’s physical appearance? How? To what degree does physical appearance determine one’s success in our society? Doe social media idealize physical appearance? How?

Close Reading Assignment: Read the handout on selected passages from chapters 17 and 20, underlining the argument of Victor Frankenstein and the creature as you read. Next, create a T-chart. On one side, write “Victor Frankenstein’s arguments” and on the other side write, “creature’s arguments.” Under each, write a bulleted list of their arguments according to what you’ve read. After writing a complete list of their arguments, write a one-paragraph (4-5 sentences), claiming which argument is more persuasive and why.

Homework: Chapters 20-22


Friday and Monday—March 2 & 5

Honors

LT: I can identify four prevalent themes in Frankenstein, find quotes that exemplify each theme, and explain the development of that theme throughout the book.

Vocab:
·      Mutability (n), mutable (adj.), mutably (adv): prone to change; capable of change or being changed
Ex. Emotions are highly mutable, changing from minute to minute
·      Commiserate (verb), commiseration (n), commiserative (adj): to feel or express sorrow or compassion for
Ex. Judy commiserates with anyone suffering from cancer, as she had cancer for several years.

Quiz over chapters 9-12

Theme Assignment: Part 1:  Choose four themes that you feel are developed in the last reading assignment.  Write the themes in the blanks.  In the remaining space, write one quote/passage from the novel that you feel express or support the theme. Part 2:  On the back, give your commentary that explains why the themes are important and how they are developed. Write the paragraph on the back in CCQC format.

Homework: Chapters 13-16





Wednesday & Thursday—February 28 & March 1

Honors

LT: I can evaluate the impact of detailed events in the plot of Shelley’s Frankenstein, and how these details contributed to the tension of the story.

WN: How do you prefer to receive bad news? (email, text, letter, Snapchat, phone call, in person, etc.) Explain why.

Vocab: Create a Google doc, and title it “Frankenstein Vocabulary.” You will use this Google doc each class period as we learn 2-3 new words. For each word, define the word, use it in your own sentence, and find an image online that captures that word.

·      Languor: weakness or weariness of body or mind
Ex. I suffer from extreme languor when I have to get up at 5:00 a.m.

·      Incredulous: unwilling to admit or accept what is offered as true
Ex. Many Americans were incredulous when they found out that Donald Trump would act as their new President.

·      Benevolent: marked by or exposed to doing good
Ex. Peter is very benevolent, as he is always donating to charitable causes even though he is by no means wealthy.

“Justine Moritz and Shelley’s Ghost Story” – worksheet – Complete the front side of this worksheet in your groups.  Evaluate the impact of Justine’s story on the ghost story.  In the outer circle, give the most disturbing or exciting details for each chapter.  Then, in the middle circle, make a claim(s) showing how the disturbing or exciting details contribute to the tension of the story.  Lastly, give an overall claim about how Justine’s story adds to the ghost story, in the center circle.  ON THE BACK, write a letter to Mary Shelley congratulating her on how the contribution of the Justine story made her ghost story more intense, creepy, or upsetting, and give her advice on how it could be improved. DO THIS ON YOUR OWN.

Homework: Frankenstein chapters 9-12


Friday & Monday—February 23 & 26

Honors

LT: I can understand the implications of the ethical debate of scientific research in our society today through debating the ethics of Stem Cell research.

Discussion Questions: In your writer’s notebook, respond to 5 of the following questions concerning your reading. Respond with at least 2-3 sentences.
1.     After years of study, Victor Frankenstein discovered how to “[bestow] animation on lifeless matter” (Shelley 31). Do humans deserve to know and use this power?
2.     Why did Victor Frankenstein’s feelings toward the creature he had created change so suddenly? (see page 35)
3.     Do you think that Victor’s reaction to his creation was justified? Why or why not?
4.     As the creator of the creature, is Victor responsible for all the future actions of this creature?
5.     Based on what has happened in the book so far, what do you believe Mary Shelley’s views are about God and the power to give life?


Intro to Stem Cell Research: Watch the following video from approximately 3:02-10:55. (You do not need to watch the video in its entirety). Look up political cartoons on stem cell research. What is message is being conveyed in each political cartoon? Groups of three were assigned a side and debated their assigned side with another group.



Homework: Read chapters 6-8




Wednesday & Thursday—February 21 & 22, 2018

LT: I can understand the main characteristics of Romantic/Gothic literature and can identify the influence of those characteristics in Frankenstein.

WN: “Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction.” -Victor Frankenstein pg. 23
Do you believe in destiny? Why or why not? Is it right for Victor to blame what happens to him on destiny? Why or why not?

Romantic Era PowerPoint and Notes: View the following PowerPoint on the Romantic Era and take notes on each slide. We discussed the slides in class, so if you have any questions, feel free to talk to me! Title your notes, “Romantic Period Notes.” Access the PowerPoint through SlideShare here: https://www.slideshare.net/StellaStowell/romantic-era-intro-powerpoint

After viewing the PowerPoint, we watched Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” music video and discussed why we are drawn to gothic tales. Watch the music video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOnqjkJTMaA

Homework: Read chapters 3-5 of Frankenstein



Friday & Tuesday—February 16 & 20, 2018

LT: I can agree or disagree with various statements regarding human nature, genetic engineering, etc., and I can provide an explanation for why I disagree or agree with each statement.

Fahrenheit 451 One-Paragraph Response Review: Each student received their one-paragraph paper and corresponding score. We discussed the criteria listed in the rubric and examined several responses that exhibited strong claims, commentary, and transitions into quotes.


Frankenstein Anticipation Guide: (Handout in class). Students are to disagree or agree with each statement and explain why they agree or disagree. After students had completed the anticipation guide, we discussed each statement as a class.

Wednesday & Thursday—February 14 & 15, 2018

LT: I can identify the characteristics of a Haiku poem and write my own haiku poem.

Haiku Writing: In your writer’s notebook, compose a haiku poem according to the characteristics we discussed. A haiku poem is a very short form of Japanese poetry consisting of three lines. Characteristically, the first line has 5 syllables, the second line has 7 syllables, and the third line has 5 syllables.

The following poems are examples of Haiku poetry:

Zombie Regret
when you gave me your
heart, valentine, you should have
known I was hungry
                                    -Chris Crowe

Tinder Love
A single photo—
all I need to know that you’re
the one—I swipe right

Untitled
Haven’t had one yet
I’m waiting for someone who
sees the light in me
                        -anonymous

Frankenstein Intro PowerPoint—Take notes in your writer’s notebooks on the introductory PowerPoint to Frankenstein. Access the slideshow through Google Slides:

Finish watching The Truman ShowComplete compare/contrast handout—comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences between The Truman Show and Fahrenheit 451. Turn in handout at the end of the hour.



Homework: Read Walton’s Letters (pgs. 1-14)



Monday & Tuesday—February 12 & 13, 2018

LT: I can apply my knowledge of the various themes we studied in Fahrenheit 451, identifying the similarities and differences between The Truman Showand Fahrenheit 451.

The Truman ShowWatch first 60 minutes of The Truman Show, completing the compare/contrast handout as we watch it.

Check in Fahrenheit 451 and check out Frankenstein.

Homework: Read the author’s (Mary Shelley) introduction to Frankenstein (pgs. V-X), found in the very beginning of the novel. This is the shortest reading ever—clearly a hyperbole, but you get the point—READ! Write FIVE things you learn about the novel and/or its author in your writer’s notebook! This will be due at the beginning of class!

Thursday & Friday—February 8 & 9, 2018

LT: I can participate in a collaborative fishbowl discussion, connecting the theme I prepared to the other themes in Fahrenheit 451.

Fishbowl Discussion—Students participate in a fishbowl discussion, in which they are required to contribute a minimum of two comments. They will also submit the notes they took during the discussion. This is your test for Fahrenheit 451!



Due: One-page written preparation for discussion, notes taken during discussion, and Writer’s Notebooks.


Tuesday & Wednesday—February 6 & 7, 2018

Honors

LT: I can determine how one of the themes in Fahrenheit 451 contributes to the degenerative nature of Fahrenheit 451’s society and determine how that theme is relevant to our own society.

Organize Writer’s Notebooks—Your Writer’s Notebooks should be in the following order:
·      If you could ban any book, movie, TV show, or song, what would it be? Why? *
·      “Are you happy?” Your Happy Experience*
·      John Lennon’s “Imagine” Lyric Annotation
·      Dystopian Theme Graphic Organizer
·      Write about a meaningful book, movie, TV show, podcast, or song that changed the way you perceive the world. *
·      2 Questions, 2 Comments, 2 Quotes Discussion Sheet
·      Beatty’s Lecture Handout
·      “How Outside Forces Shape You” handout
·      My Name Response *
·      Montag’s Escape from the Cave handout

*Assignments with an asterisk were written directly in your writer’s notebooks

DQ: According to your reading, what remedies do you think Bradbury suggests for the ills of Montag’s society?
Fishbowl Discussion Preparation: Your test for Fahrenheit 451 will be a fishbowl discussion, which we be held on February 8 and 9. In preparation for the discussion, you will be required to write a one-page single-spaced paper on a theme of your choice from Fahrenheit 451. Potential themes to choose from are: isolation, violence, conformity, censorship, identity, or technology. To what extent is the theme you selected responsible for the dystopian nature of Montag’s society?
           
g.     Choose a theme (it doesn’t have to be from the list I provided, but it needs to be relevant to Fahrenheit 451)
h.     Assert a claim (how is the theme you chose responsible for the degeneration of Montag’s society)
i.      Select three direct quotes from the novel that support your claim.
j.      Comment on each quote
k.     In the next section of your discussion paper, discuss how the theme you chose is relevant in our own society. Find an online article that demonstrates how that theme is relevant.
l.      RESPOND to the article! Do you agree/disagree with what the article’s author claims? Are there potential solutions to that particular theme in our society?

Remember, I’m not concerned about the organization of your paper, but it has to meet the criteria I stated above. It should be written in complete sentences, but it is primarily preparation for your fishbowl discussion.



Friday & Monday—February 2 & 5, 2018



Honors



LT: I can understand how Bradbury’s allusion to Plato’s allegory of the cave serves to enrich Fahrenheit 451, as it helps to illuminate Montag’s own journey “out of the cave.” 



DQ’S:

·       What do you think caused Mildred to bring about the destruction of her own house by reporting that her husband had hidden books?

·      
Why do you think Beatty mockingly tells Montag to
“pull the trigger” (pg. 113) on the flamethrower Montag has aimed at him?

·      
Why do the teenagers in the car try to kill Montag as
he crosses the avenue? How do their actions reflect what is happening in society?

·      
What insight about himself does Montag gain as he
reflects on his violent actions? 



Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” review. Discussed Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” and watched the following animated YouTube clip:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQfRdl3GTw4. This clip is a great review, if you missed class!



Montag’s Journey Out of the Cave Handout: For each of the following scenes—Montag’s house, Montag fleeing, Black’s house, Faber’s house, Montag fleeing to the river—write a brief explanation of how Montag is journeying out of the “cave,” in other words, how is he pursuing further knowledge and enlightenment. Meanwhile, how is society in or out of the “cave.” Society could be represented by the characters (i.e. Mildred or the teenagers who try to hit Montag).



Homework: pgs. 139-165 END OF NOVEL!




Wednesday & Thursday- January 31 & February 1, 2018

LT: I can do a close reading analysis of Montag’s interaction with Mildred, Mrs. Phelps, and Mrs. Bowles, identifying what is wrong/right with society according to their interactions.

Discussion—pages 93-101. What is wrong or right with society according to this scene?

One-Paragraph Response Prompt: In a well-developed paragraph answer this question: What does the scene on pages 93-101 illustrate about what is right or wrong with society in Fahrenheit 451.
·      Read carefully through the “Exceptional” column in the rubric before writing your paragraph. (See me for the paragraph rubric)

Homework: Read Day 6—pages 113-139



Monday & Tuesday-January 29 & 30, 2018

LT: I can identify how various influential texts/documents have shaped society and how outside forces, such as advertisements and brands, can have a powerful and often distracting influence on society.

DQ: Discuss your two quotes, two questions, and two comments in groups. This assignment will be kept in your writer’s notebooks.

Station Activity: (Pick up graphic organizer handout to complete this activity). Identify the brand logos on the index cards provided. Next, write down any prior-knowledge about the document/text listed on the back of each index card. If you don’t know anything about the text/ document, then simply write, “I don’t know.” Now, look up that text or document on Google. Do some research. What is the document/text about? Why is it important?
            Documents/texts that are listed on the back of the notecards:
           
            --Silent Spring, Rachel Carson
            --"Common Sense,” Thomas Paine
            --The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan
            --“I Have a Dream,” Martin Luther King
            --Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe
            --The Jungle, Upton Sinclair

Homework: Read pages 91-110 of Fahrenheit 451. Make sure you pay close attention to pages 93-101, as you will be writing an in-depth paragraph response to this section!



Thursday & Friday- January 25 & 26, 2018



LT: I can do a close analysis of Beatty’s “lecture” to Montag, applying what I’ve learned through our class discussions.



DQ:

·      Beatty explains the history of firemen to Montag. According to Beatty, why did society eventually ban books?

·      What is Montag’s reaction to Beatty’s “lecture?” How is he continually evolving or developing as a character?



Beatty’s Lecture: (Pick up handout) Throughout our reading of Fahrenheit 451, we have had several discussions directly related to Beatty’s “lecture to Montag. Consider our discussions about censorship and the characteristics of dystopian/utopian societies as you read each of the four quotes I have provided.

After reading each quote, explain in your own words what each quote means and provide a meaningful analysis. Apply some of the ideas you have developed in our various discussions to each quote. Next, consider the relevance of each quote in our own society. How is each quote relevant to our own society? 

Your responses should meaningful and well-developed!



            Quote #1: “If you don’t want a man unhappy politically, don’t give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none. Let him forget there is such a thing as war…Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs or the names of state capitals or how much corn Iowa grew last year. Cram them full of noncombustible date, chock them so damned full of ‘facts’ they feel stuffed, but absolutely ‘brilliant’ with information. Then they’ll feel they’re thinking, they’ll get a sense of motion without moving. And they’ll be happy, because facts of that sort don’t change.”



                  Quote #2: “Ask yourself, What do we want in this country, above all? People want to be happy, isn’t that right? Haven’t you heard it all your life? I want to be happy, people say. Well, aren’t they? Don’t we keep them moving, don’t we give them fun? That’s all we live for, isn’t it? For pleasure, for titillation? And you must admit our culture provides plenty of these.”



                  Quote #3: “You must understand that our civilization is so vast that we can’t have our minorities upset and stirred…Colored people don’t like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. While people don’t feel good about Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Burn it. Someone’s written a book on tobacco and cancer of the lungs? The cigarette people are weeping? Burn the book.”



                  Quote #4: “We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal. Each man the image of every other; then all are happy, for there are no mountains to make them cower, to judge themselves against. So! A book is a loaded gun in the house next door. Burn it. Take the shot from the weapon. Breach man’s mind. Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?”




Watch the following video and consider the types of questions the therapist asks Matt Damon and Jimmy Kimmel. What kind of questions could a therapist ask that would help to reconcile the issues in Mildred and Montag’s marriage. Work in groups and write a couple’s therapy script on a Google doc. Pose the questions a therapist would ask Montag and Mildred, and respond to the questions as if you were Mildred or Montag. You will continue to work on this script during the following class period.


Tuesday & Wednesday –January 23 & 24, 2018

LT: I can identify the attributes of a dystopian/utopian society and can apply that knowledge to the prevalent themes in Fahrenheit 451.

DQs:
Montag: How is his character developing? Is he changing?
Clarisse: She says she is abnormal. Is she?
Mechanical Hound: What is it? Thoughts?
Captain Beatty: What role has he played in the novel so far? What role do you think he’ll continue to play in the novel?
Old Woman: Thoughts about her?

WN: Draw a line down the center of the page. On one side write “dystopian/bad or ill society” and on the other side write “utopian/ideal or perfect society.” Write at least three characteristics or traits for each side. What characteristics do you think define the perfect society or a bad society? How do people behave in each society? What kind of laws are people bound to, or do laws even exist? Consider these questions as you characterize each society.

Lyric Annotation (see file #11): Listen to John Lennon’s song “Imagine” and Bob Dylan’s song “Blowin’ in the Wind,” annotating the lyrics as you listen. Respond to the reflection questions at the bottom of each song.

Dystopian Theme Graphic Organizer (see file #12): Choose three of the following prevalent themes in Fahrenheit 451: violence, alienation, suicide, censorship, ignorance vs. knowledge, technological advancement. First explain the presence of each theme in Montag’s society. What role does each theme play in Montag’s society? Provide evidence from the text in your explanation. Next, explain what actions could be taken to improve Montag’s society. See me for graphic organizer handout. 



Friday & Monday –January 19 & 22, 2018

WN: “Are you happy?” she said. –Fahrenheit 451
What makes you happy? Write a 1-1½ page narrative, recreating the time and scene: what were you doing; where were you; who were you with; what made you happy; how lasting was your happiness?

LT: I can identify figurative language in Fahrenheit 451 and determine how it serves to enrich the meaning of the text’s themes, characters, events, or ideas.

DQs: How does each item represent important character, events, or issues in your reading so far?
·      Fireman’s hat
·      Candle
·      Earbuds and Script
·      Pill Bottle


Graphic Organizer on Figurative Language: Define simile, metaphor, personification, and hyperbole; find two examples for each figurative device in Fahrenheit 451, and explain how each example enriches the meaning of the novel. (see file #10)



Wednesday-Thursday—January 17-18, 2018
Mrs. Stowell began teaching.

WN Book-banning: If you could ban any book, movie, TV show, or song, what would it be? Why? Explain in 3-4 sentences.

Censorship Web Search Activity: Worksheet provided in class. If absent, I can give you further instructions when you return. (see file #8)

Book check-out—Fahrenheit 451

Book check-in—The Odyssey

Reading Schedule Bookmark (see file #9)

Homework: Pages 1-21 of Fahrenheit 451





Thursday-Friday—January 11-12, 2018
Business:
·       No late work option after next Friday. It’s end of term and everything is due Friday.
·       Odyssey Quiz today.
·       Graphic Novels due today.
·       Writers Notebooks due today:
1.     Odyssey Background Powerpoint Notes
2.     Selected Chapters Summaries
3.     Odyssey Notes
4.     Greek Culture—Chapters 5-6
5.     Events, Greek Ways and Big Thoughts—Chapters 7-8

6.     Graphic Novel Planning/Homeric Epithets and Similes

Tuesday & Wednesday—January 9-10, 2018
Business:
·       Read and annotate the remaining chapters summaries for next time.
·       No late work option after next Friday. It’s end of term and everything is due Friday.
·       Writers Notebooks Due next time:
1.     Odyssey Background Powerpoint
2.     Selected Chapters Summaries
3.     Odyssey Notes
4.     Greek Culture—Chapters 5-6
5.     Events, Greek Ways and Big Thoughts—Chapters 7-8
6.     Graphic Novel Planning/Homeric Epithets and Similes

LT: Determine major themes from textual evidence in literature.

DQs:

·       What strengths and weaknesses does Odysseus display in the following stories:
o   The Land of the Dead
o   The Syrens
o   Scylla
o   Charybdis
o   The Kine of the Sun

Friday & Monday—January 5 & 8, 2018
Business:
  • Read chapters 11-12 for next time.
  • No late work option after next Friday. It’s end of term and everything is due Friday.

LT: Determine major themes from textual evidence in literature.

DQs:

  • What strengths and weaknesses does Odysseus display in the following stories:
    • The Ciconians
    • The Lotus-eaters
    • The Cyclops
    • Aeolus
    • The Laestrygonians
    • Circe

Homeric Epithets and Similes
Epithet: an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned.
"old men are often unfairly awarded the epithet “dirty.”

Simile: a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid (e.g., as brave as a lioncrazy like a fox ).


Graphic Novel Planning/Homeric Epithets and Similes Copy examples from a classmate.

Graphic Novel  Print all six sheets two-sided. 



Wednesday-Thursday—January 3-4, 2018
Business:
  • Read chapters 9-10 for next time.
  • The following scores were just put on Powerschool: Silas essay, reading book wks 7-9, discussion wks 7-9.
  • We will finish The Odyssey and have a test before the end of the term.

LT: Determine major themes from textual evidence in literature.

DQs:
  • Lessons from chapters 5-6—the pink sheet.
  • Describe the Phaeacians.
  • What memorable exchanges do we see between Odysseus and some of the Phaeacians?
  • What cosmopolitan skill and prowess does Odysseus demonstrate?

Activities:


Thursday-Friday—December 14-15, 2017
Business:
  • Chapters 7-8 for next time (Wednesday, January 3rd)
  • End of term is just after the break!

LT: Identify prominent ideas and themes manifested through characterization in literature.

DQs:
  • What cosmopolitan traits does Odysseus demonstrate?
  • What aspects of the culture of the gods are revealed in these scenes?

Activities:


Kahoot on chapters 5-6—this is your quiz!


Tuesday-Wednesday—December 12-13, 2017
Business:
·       Silas Marner essays should be finished.
·       We will read 8 chapters in The Odyssey—chapters 5-12.
o   Two chapters a day: 5-6 for next time.

Essential Question for The Odyssey:
What are the essential skills of a cosmopolitan person? (the opposite of Silas Marner)
Cosmopolitan:
--familiar with and at ease in many different countries and cultures.

LT: Acquire foundational understanding of the setting and circumstances of The Odyssey.

DQs: Who is Odysseus?

Activities:

Chapter/Book Summaries (see file #2) Read the summaries for chapters/books 1-4.

1.     Take notes without writing words (except names)
2.     Be prepared to repeat back the story exactly as you hear it.
3.     Use symbols and pictures to make meaning of text that can’t be written.

Notes on PowerPoint presentation (find on blog)



Read chapters 5-6 for next time.


Friday & Monday—December 8 & 11, 2017

LT: Develop a thematic idea from a whole text into an essay.

Finishing essays.


We watched the last part of A Simple Twist of Fate.



Wednesday-Thursday—December 6-7, 2017
Business:
  • Starting The Odyssey as soon as we finish Silas Marner work.

LT: Develop a thematic idea from a whole text into an essay.

Actitivies:

  • Typing essays on Drive today.

Monday-Tuesday—December 4-5, 2017
Business:
·       Next time you will be writing your essay during class. Come prepared with brainstorming completed.
·       Writer’s Notebooks due today.
·       Quiz today on Silas Marner
·       Silas Marner Writer’s Notebook:
1.     WN: Betrayal of a Friend
2.     WN: Slideshow: “A Tale of Two Villages”
3.     WN: Raveloe (not periods 1, 3)
4.     WN: Weaving and Hoarding
5.     WN: Slideshow: Cass Family Subplot
6.     Review and Reflection: Chapter 3
7.     WN: Dunstan’s Power Rankings
8.     WN: Silas Forced to Change/Lantern Yard Ratings (not 7th)
9.     WN: 5 Quotes
10.  WN: 6 Quotes
11.  WP: Paragraph—Chapters 13-15
12.  Targeting Silas, Eppie & Godfrey
13.  Three Views
14.  Chapter 1: Silas Marner’s Former Life… Chapter 1: Silas Marner’s Life in Raveloe; From Chapter 2: Weaving and Hoarding
15.  From Chapters 3 & 4
16.  From Chapters 5, 7 & 8
17.  From Chapters 9-10
18.  From Chapters 11-12
19.  From Chapters 13-15
20.  From Chapters 16 & 17
21.  Chapters 18-Conclusion

LT: Evaluate a theme developed through an entire text.

DQs:
·       What do we learn about Godfrey from his attempt to adopt Eppie? What do we learn about Nancy?
·       How does Silas come out in the end—socially and in his relationships? Why?

Activities:
Revisit Three Views
Quiz on Silas Marner

  

Examples of claims are sub-claims that are interpretive:

Whole-book Idea
Evidence
Sub-claims
Claim
Dolly brought Silas lard cakes…
Dolly’s lard cakes were key in her becoming Silas’s friend.

The food at the Squire’s parties were important in maintaining unity in the town.


Good relationships are based on good cooking.

Character-focused Idea
Evidence
Sub-claims
Claim
Godfrey gave Silas and Eppie furniture…
Godfrey’s giving of things to Silas and Eppie shows he was generous at heart.

Godfrey’s providing the wedding lunch at the Rainbow shows he is generous even after his disappointment in not adopting Eppie.



Godfrey’s generosity was the hidden secret in his relationships.




Scene-based Idea
Evidence
Sub-claims
Claim
Nancy tells Eppie she has an obligation to Godfrey…
Nancy’s loyalty to Godfrey during the attempt shows how truly committed to him she is.

Eppie’s loyalty to Silas shows how his sacrifice for her has bonded her to him.


Godfrey and Nancy’s failed attempt to adopt Eppie demonstrates the essence of good relationships—loyalty.



Thursday-Friday—November 30-December 1, 2017
Business:
·       Sub for Santa
·       Discussion points were put on over the weekend. Make up missing points ASAP.
·       Make sure all reading excerpts are underlined, highlighted, annotated…
·       When you are absent, check the blog before talking to me.
·       Be ready for a quiz on Silas Marner next time.
·       Silas Marner Writer’s Notebook must be completed by next time:
1.     WN: Betrayal of a Friend
2.     WN: Slideshow: “A Tale of Two Villages”
3.     WN: Raveloe (not periods 1 & 3)
4.     WN: Weaving and Hoarding
5.     WN: Slideshow: Cass Family Subplot
6.     Review and Reflection: Chapter 3
7.     WN: Dunstan’s Power Rankings/Lantern Yard Power Rankings
8.     WN: Silas Forced to Change
9.     WN: 5 Quotes
10.  WN: 6 Quotes
11.  WP: Paragraph—Chapters 13-15
12.  Targeting Silas, Eppie & Godfrey
13.  Three Views
14.  Chapter 1: Silas Marner’s Former Life… Chapter 1: Silas Marner’s Life in Raveloe; From Chapter 2: Weaving and Hoarding
15.  From Chapters 3 & 4
16.  From Chapters 5, 7 & 8
17.  From Chapters 9-10
18.  From Chapters 11-12
19.  From Chapters 13-15
20.  From Chapters 16 & 17
21.  Chapters 18-Conclusion

LT: Use textual analysis to generate thematic observations for specific ideas, characters, and episodes.

DQs:
·       Describe the relationship Silas and Eppie have.
·       Describe the relationship Godfrey and Nancy have.
·       What is Nancy’s most defining trait?

Activities:




Tuesday-Wednesday—November 28-29, 2017
Business:
  • Discussion points were put on over the weekend. Make up missing points ASAP.
  • Make sure all reading excerpts are underlined, highlighted, annotated…

LT: Analyze themes using a balance of text-specific and generalized commentary.

DQs:
  • What do we learn about Godfrey from his reactions to the events involving Silas, the baby and Mollie?
  • What do we learn about Silas from his reaction to the baby the night she walks into his house?
  • Describe the changes that take place for Silas in the months after he takes charge of the child.

Activities:
For next time:


WN: Paragraph—Chapters 13-15
  • Follow up:
    • Write a paragraph using the format below. Choose your own quote from today’s reading:
      • Claim
      • Context
      • Quote
      • Generalization
      • Comment

Example:
After a long period of emotional detachment from others, Silas shows that he still has the ability to be loyal. When Mrs. Kimble attempts to take the baby from Silas, he responds, “No—no—I can’t part with it, it can’t let it go, It’s come to me—I’ve a right to keep it.” The quality of loyalty is impressive because it requires sacrifice and commitment. Silas is evidently still willing and able to make this commitment. This is especially impressive after his past experiences in Lantern Yard.

Claim


Context (for quote)

Quote


General comment


Text-based comment

Example #2:
Godfrey is all mixed up emotionally. When he understands Silas wants to keep his daughter, he states: “Poor little thing! Let me give something   towards finding it clothes.” It’s interesting how a gesture can be a combination of both generosity and cruel apathy. Godfrey appears on one level to be kind and generous. On another level, though, he’s showing terrible neglect toward his daughter.
Claim

Context


Quote



General comment


Text-based comments



Tuesday & Monday—November 21 & 27, 2017
Business:

LT: Analyze themes using a balance of text-specific and generalized commentary.

DQs:
  • Judging from what is said about Molly, what do you think of both Godfrey’s and Molly’s handling of their relationship?
  • What do we learn about Silas from his reaction to seeing the baby?

The quotes all come from chapter 12. The format for these analysis paragraphs is as follows:

1. This book: Theme
2. In general: Theme
3. This book: Theme

The goal with all commentary is insight—probe as deeply as you can.

Example Analysis Paragraph for Quote #1:
Godfrey’s mistake was too much passion and too little compassion. This got him into trouble with Molly in the first place, and then again when he told her how he felt about being married to her. When a person is in an inferior position in some way—socially, economically, emotionally—they react better when they receive understanding and assistance, as opposed to anger and condemnation, from those who hold power over them. Pouring salt on their wounds can only encourage them to do something desperate and destructive. If Godfrey had held his tongue, or, better yet, showed compassion towards Molly in her miserable predicament, she probably would not have sworn vengeance against him. Instead of recklessly endangering her life to spite Godfrey, she might have felt some motivation to change.

Short Version (three sentences)
Godfrey’s mistake was too much passion and too little compassion. When a person is struggling, it’s better to encourage than to criticize. If Godfrey had been more positive with Molly, she might have become a better mother.


Write paragraphs of analysis that follow the format above. Offset your general observations with bolded or underlined words.

Six Quotes from Chapter 12
1.     Starts with, “The journey on . . .” and ends with, “. . . eldest son’s wife.”
2.     Starts with, “It is seldem . . .” and ends with, “. . . her vindictiveness.”
3.     Starts with, “She had set . . .” and ends with, “. . . to her lips.”
4.     Starts with, “Turning towards . . .” and ends with, “. . . over it’s head.”
5.     Starts with, “Could this be . . .” and ends with, “. . . beyond the door.”
6.     Starts with, “But along with . . .” and ends with, “. . . been brought out.”



Friday & Monday—November 17 & 20, 2017

LT: Identify both text-local and general themes based on textual evidence.





Friday & Monday—November 17 & 20, 2017

LT: Identify both text-local and general themes based on textual evidence.






Wednesday-Thursday—November 15-16, 2017
Business:
·       The counselling office is doing College and Career Readiness work today in class.

LT: I can identify complex character development based on textual analysis.

DQ:
·       What changes begin to occur in Silas’s life because of the loss of his money?

WN: Silas Forced to Change
Find three quotes from chapter 7.
·       One spoken or thought by Silas
·       One spoken or thought by another character
·       One observed by the author

Indicate what each quote suggests about how Silas is being forced to change by the loss of his money. Synthesize your three observations into an overall change you see taking place.

Quote
What change?
The overall change
By Silas






By Character





By Author






For next time, read:




Monday-Tuesday—November 13-14, 2017
Business:
·       Discussion Make-Up
o   Should be turned in ASAP after the score posting.
o   Can be done using any text we have recently read or are reading now.
o   Needs to be done exactly according to the instructions on the yellow paper.

LT: I can evaluate complex ideas based on textual analysis.

DQ: How is Dunstan Cass doing on the relationship and society power rankings?

WN: Dunstan’s Power Rankings
Write two CCQC (claim, context, quote, commentary) paragraphs on Dunstan Cass.
·       First Paragraph: Evaluate Dunstan on his power and fulfillment in Relationships.
·       Second Paragraph: Evaluate Dunstan on his power and fulfillment in his dealings with Society.
·       Make your claims insightful and original.

Read and annotate




·       Note: Chapter 6 takes place entirely at the Rainbow and demonstrates how the men in the town discuss every day goings on and past events. Nothing happens that involves the story’s plot. They are discussion ghosts when Silas enters the Rainbow at the beginning of chapter 7.



Thursday-Friday—November 9-10, 2017

LT: Apply the themes of power and fulfillment in relationships and society to Godfrey Cass.

WN: Weaving and Hoarding
Write a paragraph or bullet points addressing each of the following. Include a quote or an illustration for each one:
  • Money is different for Silas…
  • Helping Sally Oates…
  • Silas and his coins at night…
  • Breaking the brown earthenware pot…





Tuesday-Wednesday—November 7-8, 2017
LT: Explore the ideas of power and fulfillment in relationships and society.

  • Assess Silas and William in terms of power and fulfillment in relationships and society based on “Silas Marner’s Former Life in Lantern Yard”.
    • Silas on Power in Relationships
    • Silas on Fulfillment in Relationships
    • Silas on Power in Society
    • Silas on Fulfillment in Society
    • William on Power in Relationships
    • William on Fulfillment in Relationships
    • William on Power in Society
    • William on Fulfillment in Society


  • Re-assess Silas in terms of power and fulfillment in relationships and society based on this reading.

WN: Raveloe
  • Analyze Raveloe using a spider web graphic organizer:
    • 1 core observation about Raveloe
    • 4 sub-ideas
    • 2 evidences for each sub-idea












Friday & Monday—November 3 & 6, 2017
Business:
  • Anyone who missed the test needs to take it today.
  • About Writer’s Notebooks:
    • Do not use your writer’s notebook for storage of all previous assignments.
    • If your notebook is falling apart, please replace it.
    • You need a notebook that is only for this class.
    • We will be writing in the notebook more during our reading of Silas Marner
  • I need your copies of Julius Caesar.

LT: Explore the ideas of power and fulfillment in relationships and society.

WN: Betrayal of a Friend
Address this topic in your writer’s notebook by responding to the following questions:
  • Describe what the idea of “betrayal of a friend” makes you think of.
  • How is betrayal from a friend different from betrayal by other people?
  • Provide a brief account of a betrayal by a friend that you are familiar with—either from your own life of from another’s life.
  • What would make some people more vulnerable to being devastated by the betrayal of a friend while others seem less affected?



We watched a clip from Silas Marner the movie.




Wednesday-Thursday—November 1-2, 2017
Business:
  • Julius Caesar writer’s notebooks passed back today.
  • I will have the writer’s notebook and test scores on Powerschool by tomorrow.
  • Anyone who missed the test will take it today.
  • About Writer’s Notebooks:
    • Do not use your writer’s notebook for storage of all previous assignments.
    • If your notebook is falling apart, please replace it.
    • You need a notebook that is only for this class.
    • We will be writing in the notebook more during our reading of Silas Marner
  • I will collect copies of Julius Caesar today.
  • I am collecting your pagetrackers for Julius Caesar today.

LT: Evaluate whether political power is healthy or corrupt.

DQs:
  • What kind of political power is healthy? What kind corrupt?

WN: Healthy or Corrupt Political Power
  • While watching the movie of Julius Caesar, describe times you see political power on display (left side of page) and provide commentary on whether it is an exhibition of healthy or corrupt power (right side of page). If you were absent, you can do this using the play itself.

Examples of Political Power
Healthy or Corrupt?












Monday-Tuesday—October 30-31, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on Julius Caesar today. 

Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook due today:
  1. WN: Notes on Background
  2. WN: Playing Politics
  3. Featuring Cassius/WN: Cassius at Work (not 4th)
  4. Brochure on Conspiracies
  5. Comparing Two Roman Marriages
  6. Carefully Chosen Words
  7. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
  8. Deplorables
  9. “Words before blows…”

LTs:
  • Demonstrate general knowledge of the text of Julius Caesar.
  • Make a text-based observation on politics based on Julius Caesar.

DQs:
  • What have you learned about the public and private side of political power?

  • Brochure on political power.
Example Ideas:

Great politicians need to be “politely” proud.
  • Politicians do better when they present themselves meekly.
  • Politicians have to be comfortable putting themselves forward in front of people.
  • Politicians can act in despicable ways, but only in private.
Capable politicians embrace hypocrisy (being two-faced).
  • Telling the truth can, at times, be good politically.
  • Telling lies is often necessary to paint a picture favorable to your platform.
  • Being one person in private and another in public is necessary to political success

Thursday-Friday—October 26-27, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on Julius Caesar next time

Julius Caesar Writer’s Notebook due next time
  1. WN: Notes on Background
  2. WN: Playing Politics
  3. Featuring Cassius/WN: Cassius at Work
  4. Brochure on Conspiracies
  5. Comparing Two Roman Marriages
  6. Carefully Chosen Words
  7. Antony’s Speech and the Rhetorical Triangle
  8. Deplorables
  9. “Words before blows…”

LT: Evaluate the rhetorical and persuasive skills of the combatants.

DQs:
  • Who are the better trash talkers?



Finish Groups Skit Scripts

Wednesday-Thursday—October 18-19, 2017
LT: Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.

DQs:
  • Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.
    • Brutus
    • Cassius
    • Antony


Time to work on groups skits

Wednesday-Thursday—October 18-19, 2017
LT: Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.

DQs:
  • Evaluate how the major players are dealing with the aftermath of Caesar’s assassination.
    • Brutus
    • Cassius
    • Antony


Time to work on groups skits

Monday-Tuesday—October 16-17
Business:
·       All scores for Term 1 are on the Powerschool.
·       All discussion make-up is due this week.

LT: Identify use of the Rhetoical Triangle in speeches in Julius Caesar



Time to work on Caesar skits


Thursday-Friday—October 12-13, 2017
Business:
·       Hero Journey stories are graded. If you don’t have a score, it’s because your name wasn’t on your sections.
·       Time to take care of 1st term grade issues.

LT: Evaluate marriages and political strategy in Julius Caesar.

DQs:
·       Evaluate the marriages of Brutus and Portia and Caesar and Calpurnia. Who has the better marriage?


Groups Caesar Skits Assignment


  • At least one skit for each day’s reading.  
  • Focus on key scenes or a key scene. Choose from the list on your pagetracker.
  • You must use a typed script.
    • Name script: JC Skit, Day 1, Fred Jones, Ellen Thomas, Mark Albertson
    • Share it to: turninmyessay@gmail.com
  • Your skit must demonstrate a clear understanding of what you are presenting.
  • Convert Shakespeare’s words to your own words.
  • Use props, clothing, etc.
  • Involve everyone in your group.
  • 4-5 minutes presentation time—no less!

Tuesday-Wednesday—October 10-11, 2017
Business:
·       Hero Journey Stories scores going on by tomorrow.

LT: Evaluate the institution of marriage in Julius Caesar.

DQs:
·       What makes a marriage strong? Name three things.
·       Who was the better marriage—Brutus and Portia or Caesar and Calpurnia?





Friday & Monday—October 6 & 9, 2017
Business:

LT: Identify and articulate text-based themes in Julius Caesar.

Audio of Act I, scene III and Act II, scene I

We read the first part of Act II, scene I

Video of Act II, scene I

  • The main idea is Conspiracies
  • Find quotes from Act II, scene I
  • Derive “rules” about conspiracies from the quotes



Wednesday-Thursday—October 4-5, 2017
Business:
·       Turn in Hobbit books.
·       Turn in Hobbit Pagetrackers

LT: Begin exploring the presence of private (secret) and public politics in Act I of Julius Caesar.

WN: Playing Politics
·       What do you know about the game of politics?
·       How do people win in politics? Why do they lose?
·       What kind of people are successful in politics?
·       What advice would you give to someone considering getting into politics? Make a list of do’s and don’ts.

Scene One
·       What’s going on in this scene?
·       What are Flavius and Marullus criticizing?
Scene Two
·       Cassius is playing the game of politics.

WN: Cassius at Work
·       For each of the following five segments, summarize the conversation (left side of page) and comment on what Cassius is up to (right side of page).

1.     “Brutus with himself at war . . .” (p. 4.6-5.4)                              
2.     “. . . can you see your face?” (p. 5.4-6.3)                                   
3.     “. . . a man of such a feeble temper . . . ” (p. 6.3-7.6)      
4.     “. . . under these hard conditions . . . ” (7.6-9.1)              
“Thy honourable metal may be wrought . . . ” (p. 11.9-12.8)        

Monday-Tuesday—October 2-3, 2017
Business:
  • I will be grading Hero Journey stories soon.
  • Place the Hobbit essay on the top of your “Life” file.

LT: Write an essay that explores in-depth the theme of adventure or heroism in The Hobbit.

WN: Notes on Background
·       Take notes on the slideshow on Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

Julius Caesar Overview
  • Act I: Cassius talking with Brutus and others about the Caesar problem.
  • Act II: Brutus and the conspirators planning the attack.
  • Act III: The assassination and then addressing the people.
  • Act IV: The two opposing sides (Antony and Octavius versus Brutus and Cassius) talk, argue, and plan.
  • Act V: The two sides battle at Philippi; death of Brutus.




Thursday-Friday—September 28-29, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due today
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments (periods 1 & 4 only)
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter
9.     WN: Deus Ex Machina/Defining Moments

LT: Articulate and find textual support for thematic development in response to a prompt.

·       For both the heroism and adventure questions bellow, come up with once claim, two sub-claims and four quotes from The Hobbit (two per sub-claim).

In-Class Essay (next class): Adventure or Heroism in The Hobbit
In a well-organized essay, address one of the following questions:
  • What statement does The Hobbit make about the nature of heroism?
  • What does The Hobbit say about how adventure changes a person?
Examples of Claims and Sub-claims.
Notice that sub-claims are claims (not evidence) that support the overall Claim.

Evidence
Sub-claims
Claims
















Thorin basically goes insane at the high point of his adventure.

Smaug loses his composure when he is challenged.



The dwarves lack initiative when they face difficulties.

The master of the town displays cowardice when things get intense.



The serious and sober are often the first to detect and act against danger.

The laid back and lazy are sometimes able to meet danger with fresh energy and creativity.



Dishonesty allows heroes to safeguard powerful secrets.

Dishonesty is sometimes necessary to limit the spread of evil works.

Adventure can be a cause of insanity in some people.





  
Adventure exposes a person’s weaknesses.




  

Heroes come from all kinds of backgrounds.




  


Dishonesty can be a key hero trait.





Tuesday & Wednesday—September 26-27, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due today
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments (periods 1 & 4 only)
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter
9.     WN: Deus Ex Machina/Defining Moments

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next time.
·       Hero Journey Stories
o   Have all 10 or 12 stages represented at least in outline form.
o   Remember to include names of contributors to any section.
o   Students individually must contribute the equivalent of three sections/chapters.
§  Each section/chapter should be minimum ½ page single-spaced or 1 page double-spaced.

LT: Identify complex issues in plot development.

WN: Defining Moments
Consider how each of the following scenes serves as a defining moment in the story. Present your analysis in the form of three paragraphs (one for each scene) that use the construction we have worked on (claim, context, quote, commentary, closing sentence):

Three Key Episodes from Chapters 17-19:
·       276-278 The Arkenstone influences negotiations
·       288-290 Bilbo visits Thorin after the battle
·       302-304 Bilbo returns home to an estate sale

DQs:
Plot Review
·       How does the Arkenstone impact negotiations?
·       How does it alter friendships and alliances?
·       Describe the Battle of Five Armies.
·       How are various groups reconciled after the battle?
·       Describe Bilbo’s journey home.
·       How are things changed for Bilbo when he returns home?
·       How is Bilbo changed?



Friday & Monday—September 22 & 25, 2017
Business:
·       Holler at me when you do anything on your “Life” file that needs to be regraded.
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due next Tuesday/Wednesday
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next Tuesday/Wednesday

LT: Identify complex issues in plot development.

DQs: Identify what is happening in the plot and under the surface in the following sections:
·       249-251—Bard killing Smaug
·       265-267—Thorin responding to the position of Bard and the Elvenking
·       271-274—Bilbo negotiating with Bard and the Elvenking



Wednesday-Thursday—September 20-21, 2017
Business:
·       PSAT Test—October 11th, see flier
·       Hobbit Writer’s Notebook: Due next Tuesday/Wednesday
1.     WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-2
2.     Rivendale: Thematic/Graphic Analysis
3.     Three Revealing Moments
4.     Paragraphs and Parts-Chapter 6
5.     Beorn
6.     Scouting Bilbo
7.     The Hero Journey and the Hobbit
8.     Statements that Matter

·       Quiz on The Hobbit next Tuesday/Wednesday

LT: Analyze, using evidence, major themes and characterizations.

DQs:
·       How are the dwarves portrayed differently than Bilbo in the Smaug scenes?
·       Describe Smaug.
·       Report on the Arkenstone.
·       To what extent is Bilbo’s heroism expanding?
·       To what extent is Bilbo’s bagginsism still apparent?


Monday-Tuesday—September 18-19, 2017
Business
  • Discussing 10-11 today.
  • Read 12-13 for next time.
Review “Scouting Bilbo”

DQ: Characterizations in Chapter 10
Describe Tolkien’s characterization of the following characters in chapter 10:
  • The  Master
  • The Elves and the Elvenking
  • The townsmen of Laketown
  • Thorin and the Dwarves
  • Bilbo

Ø  What conflicts or tensions exist among the above groups?

Larger DQs:
  • What do we learn about the dwarves by the way they present themselves and the way they are received among the laketown people?
  • What examples of leadership do we see in the group as they advance toward and begin camping at the Lonely Mountain?





Thursday-Friday—September 15-16, 2017
Business
  • Discussing chapters 8-9 today.
  • Read 10-11 for next time.
  • Scoring the last two Life assignments today.

LT:  Analyze textual passages for themes.

DQs:
  • Review Claims from chapter 7.
    • The Group?
    • Beorn?
    • Gandalf?
    • Bilbo?
  • What changes for Bilbo in chapters 8-9?
    • Include quotes in your answer.



Tuesday-Wednesday—September 12-14, 2017
LT: Analyze a text to determine overall themes and characterizations. 

DQs:
·       What does Beorn contribute to the story?
·       What is Gandalf up to in this phase?
·       What sides of Bilbo do we see?
·       What phase are we in during chapter 7?
  • How does this phase (chapter 7) compare/contrast to earlier phases?



Friday & Monday—September 8 & 11, 2017
10 Honors English

LT: Analyze and extend a theme found in the text.

DQs:
·       Describe the scene where Bilbo re-joins the dwarves and Gandalf.
·       Is Bilbo’s identity within the group changing?
·       How does having the ring affect Bilbo?
·       Is Gandalf’s view that there’s more to Bilbo than the others know proving true?


  

Wednesday-Thursday—September 6-7, 2017
Business:
  • Discussion make-up
  • Re-submitting Writer’s Notebooks
 DQs:
  • Discuss the nature of goblins.
  • Discuss Gollum.
  • What do we learn about Bilbo from his dealings with Gollum?
  • What does the episode involving Bilbo and Gollum reveal about Bilbo and Gollum?


“Life” Assignment: Bilbo and Gollum
  • In 1-2 pages (double-spaced), discuss what we learn about Bilbo from his experience with Gollum in chapter 5. Include an overall observation about Bilbo, and several supporting observations, as well as evidence from chapter 5.
  • Use effective paragraphing to separate supporting observations.
  • Come up with a title that conveys insight.
  • Do this on you “Life” file. Push down previous assignments so that this one is on top.
  • This is a 40 minute, in-class, timed-write.




Friday & Tuesday—September 1 & 5, 2017
10 Honors English

Business:
·       Opportunity today for re-take on Summer Reading Quiz

LT: Use textual evidence in identifying and articulating themes in chapter 3 of The Hobbit.  

DQ: What themes prevail in the Rivendale section?




Wednesday-Thursday—August 30-31, 2017
Business:
  • Summer Reading Quiz Re-take Friday/Tuesday during class.
  • Writer’s Notebook Turned in Today:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     WN: Cave Drawing
5.     Idea-building

LT: Describe the characterization of Bilbo using textual evidence.

DQ: What do you make of Bilbo? How do you define him?

On your “Life” file (on Google Drive): Analyzing your Baggins and Took sides:
  • Write a 1-2 page, double-spaced personal exploration by doing the following:
    • Paragraph 1: My “Baggins” side—the safe, socially-cautious side. Discuss your experiences and thinking.
    • Paragraph 2: My “Took” side—the adventure-loving, risk-taking side. Discuss your experiences and thinking.
    • Paragraph 3: When my Baggins and Took sides struggle with each other.
    • Come up with an appropriate title.

Monday-Tuesday—August 28-29, 2017
Business:
  • Things we’ve done that will be turned in next time:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     WN: Cave Drawing
5.     Idea-building
  • “The Life of You” should be finished on Google Drive. I am reading and scoring these now.

Looking at Plato’s Cave Allegory
·       Do two organic builds (from left to right) on the following:
o   Leaving the cave—what does it reveal about the nature of learning?
o   Re-entering the cave—what does it reveal about the nature of learning?
·       For each Idea-build, include:
o   6+ Evidences
o   3+Sub-claims
o   1-2 Claims

Starting The Hobbit

Checking out books

Pagetrackers w/ Reading Schedule (see file #7 in the classroom)
  • Requirement: a plot note every 3-5 pages.

WN: Concept Map (spider web): Pages 1-3
  • Bilbo Baggins in the main idea.
    • 4 second level ideas
      • 3-5 third level ideas for each second level idea
Read chapter 1
  • Look for Bilbo’s vacillations between his Baggins and Took sides.

Thursday-Friday—August 24-25, 2017
Business:
  • Summer Reading Quiz Retakes: If you would like to re-take the summer reading quiz, do it during the next two consultations.
  • Things we’ve done that will be turned in next week:
1.     Positive Double Negative Thinking
2.     WN: Poem Quiz
3.     Plato’s Cave Allegory
4.     Cave Drawing
  • “The Life of You” should be finished on Google Drive

WN: Poem Quiz
  • Write out all of “Say Naught the Struggle Naught Availeth”

Quiz on “Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth”
·       0-5 goofs=15/15 points
·       6-10 goofs=10/15 points
·       11-15 goofs=5/15 points
  
  • Highlight important details.

 WN: Cave Drawing
  • Using two pages of your writer’s notebook, draw a detailed sketch of what Plato describes in his Cave Allegory.
  • Include 15-20 labeled items, each a quote or a paraphrase from the text, and number them chronologically in the order they occur in the text.


Tuesday-Wednesday—August 22-23, 2017
Business:
  • Absent last time? Do paragraph pre-assessment.
  • Save everything we’ve done—it will be turned in.
  • Turn in signed disclosures.
 WN: Poem Quiz
  • We put this off until next time to save time for the summer reading quiz.

Summer reading quiz
  • If you were absent, make this up with me ASAP.

·       This is due next class.

Friday & Monday—August 18 & 21, 2017
Business:
  • Quiz on summer reading next time.
  • Turn in signed disclosure statements by next time.
Quiz on 3rd and 4th stanzas of Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth (no make-up)


Wednesday-Thursday—August 16-17, 2017
Business:

Quiz on first two stanzas of “Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth”

Homework
  • Memorize the last two stanzas for next time.

DQ: Are men like Caesar good or bad for the world?




Tuesday—August 15, 2017
Business:
  • Summer reading check
  • Bring a reading book every day all year.
  • Bring a spiral bound notebook, dedicated to this class only, every day all year.
  • Test any day on Plutarch’s Lives of Caesar and Brutus. Be ready!
  • My blog:
  • suthys10honorsenglish.blogspot.com
    • If you are absent, go to the blog that day!

Homework:
  • Memorize the first two stanzas of “Say Not…” for next time.

Overview of Class


  • We discussed and re-wrote stanzas for the first two stanzas.